http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/topnav/topics/consumer-confidence2019-11-25T00:02:48.519ZConsumer ConfidenceAdobe Experience ManagerMasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence (2013 H1) Asia/Pacific Desmond Choong Report on MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence<p>(Based on 2013 H1 Survey Findings)</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41<sup>st</sup> survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>Chart 1a: Summary of Index, Status &amp; Change from Last Half – Asia/Pacific</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart1aMICC.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="567" height="349" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart1aMICC.jpg"></a></p> <p>Chart 1b:&nbsp; ASIA/PACIFIC - Index Scores for 2010 H2 - 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender &amp; Age Group</p> <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart1bMICC.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="565" height="340" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart1bMICC.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p><b>ASIA/PACIFIC</b></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> Overall sentiment improved slightly; Japanese sentiment surged<p>Stable economic growth in Asia/Pacific estimated at 5.75% in the course of 2013 on the back of receding risks emanating from advanced economies, resilient domestic demand, and improved labor markets<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup> helped set the stage for improved consumer sentiment across the region. <b>The Index of Consumer Confidence for Asia/Pacific<b><sup>[<a href="#2">2</a>]</sup></b> (2013H1) gained 1.2 index points from the last survey (2012 H2) to 63.3 index points</b>, with the indicator of Employment showing the largest increase of 3.2 index points, followed by Stock Market (+2.3 index points), Economy (+1.6 index points), and Regular Income (+0.4 index points). Quality of life was the only indicator that shed 1.5 index points. Comparison across gender and age showed that confidence levels among males and those aged 30 or less were higher at 64.9 index points and 65.3 index points, respectively, compared to females (62.0 index points) and those aged 30 or more (62.4 index points).</p> <p>Across the region, sentiment among consumers in India, Indonesia, China, the Philippines and Myanmar were very optimistic, while those in Australia, Hong Kong, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan and Vietnam remained neutral<b>. Japan emerged as the star in the survey</b> with the most substantial improvement in sentiment – the overall index surged 37.0 index points from the previous survey to 60.7 index points. Sentiment among Taiwanese and Korean consumers also showed significant improvement, with the index gaining 19.2 index points and 14.8 index points to 52.4 index points and 53.5 index points, respectively. The survey found sentiment among consumers in Bangladesh showing the steepest decline, with the index shedding 39.5 index points to 22.2 index points, underpinned by political uncertainty, a series of strikes, and crisis in the key garment sector.<b></b></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="1"></a>1]<i> “Regional Economic Outlook: Asia and Pacific: Shifting risks, New Foundations for Growth”, International Monetary Fund, April 2013, Online http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/reo/2013/apd/eng/areo0413.htm</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="2"></a>2] <i>Countries covered in Asia/Pacific include Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Bangladesh and Myanmar.</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> JAPAN: Sentiment surged to levels not seen since 2005<p>Higher-than-expected 1Q 2013 economic growth of 3.5%, a pickup in consumer spending and exports<sup>[<a href="#3">1</a>]</sup>, rising stock prices and anticipation of positive spill-over effects stemming from Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s “Abenomics<sup>[<a href="#4">2</a>]</sup>” economic strategy have helped spur consumer sentiment levels across Japan.&nbsp;</p> <p>The overall index advanced 37.0 index points to 60.7 index points, the highest it has been since the 2005 H2 survey when the index reached 63.0 index points<sup>[<a href="#5">3</a>]</sup> – in 2005, the Japanese economy grew by 2.8% on the back of robust consumer spending<sup>[<a href="#6">4</a>]</sup>, increasing capital investment and export growth<sup>[<a href="#7">5</a>]</sup>.</p> <p>Confidence levels for the economy gained the most (+49.5 index points to 73.1 index points), followed by employment (+46.2 index points to 63.9 index points), and stock market (+41.3 index points to 79.8 index points). The indicators of regular income and quality of life also showed considerable improvements, gaining 23.9 index points and 24.1 index points, respectively, effectively pushing the indicators closer to the neutral point.</p> <p>It is interesting to note that across all major indicators, males were found to be more optimistic, especially for employment (male: 67.9 index points; female: 60.4 index points); economy (male: 76.2 index points; female: 70.2 index points); and stock market (male: 82.4 index points; female: 76.6 index points). The survey also found consumers aged &lt;30 to be significantly more optimistic towards quality of life (52.4 index points), as compared to those aged 30 and above (34.8 index points).&nbsp;</p> <p>Chart 2:&nbsp; JAPAN - Index Scores for 2010 H2 - 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender &amp; Age</p> <p></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart2MICCjapan.jpg"><img width="586" height="353" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart2MICCjapan.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="3"></a>1]<i> “Japan’s economy growing at 3.5% annualized rate”, The New York Times, 16 May 2013, Online, http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/17/business/global/japans-economy-growing-at-3-5-annualized-rate.html</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="4"></a>2] <i>Prime Minister Abe’s 3-policy pillars include: (i) ramping up government spending, (ii) injecting money into the economy on a massive scale; and (iii) structural reforms as quoted in the article “Japan: Is Abenomics working?”, CNN Money, 15 May 2013, Online http://money.cnn.com/2013/05/15/news/economy/japan-abenomics/index.html</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="5"></a>3] <i>The index of Consumer Confidence for Japan was on an uptrend from 2004 H2 (37.7 index points) to 2007 H1 (66.8 index points), before it started to tumble in 2007 H2 (48.6 index points) due to the global financial crisis.</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="6"></a>4] <i>“Japan’s economy takes off in fourth quarter of 2005”, Industry Week, 17 Feb 2006, Online http://www.industryweek.com/global-economy/japans-economy-takes-fourth-quarter-2005</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="7"></a>5] <i>“Japanese economy in 2005 and beyond: Beginning of a sustained growth cycle”, Japan Economic Monthly, Vol. 22, January 2006, Online http://www.jetro.go.jp/en/reports/survey/pdf/2006_09_other.pdf</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> TAIWAN: Significant improvement in consumer sentiment<p>Bolstered by a pickup in external demand (especially from China), a stronger tourism sector and private investment growth as well as improved labor market conditions<sup>[<a href="#8">1</a>]</sup>, sentiment among Taiwanese consumers gained substantively. The overall index for Taiwan increased by 19.2 index points to 52.4 index points, more than doubling that seen in 2012 H1 (25.7 index points). This effectively positions sentiment back above the neutral point<sup>[<a href="#9">2</a>]</sup>. The gain in the index was buoyed by significant improvements in sentiment across all major indicators: employment (+27.4 index points to 54.5 index points; more than double), economy (+22.0 index points to 50.9 index points), regular income (+20.0 index points to 60.2 index points), stock market (+14.3 index points to 60.1 index points) and quality of life (+12.7 index points to 36.1 index points).&nbsp;</p> <p>The survey found sentiment among males to be more upbeat across all indicators, especially on the economy (+16.7 index points) and stock market (+16.4 index points). With the exception of the economy, consumers aged &lt;30 were generally more optimistic than those aged 30 and above, in particular on their regular income.&nbsp;</p> <p>Chart 3:&nbsp; TAIWAN - Index Scores for 2010 H2 - 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender &amp; Age<b></b></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart3MICCtaiwan.jpg"><img width="564" height="341" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart3MICCtaiwan.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="8"></a>1] <i>“Taiwan’s 2013 economic growth forecast at 3.5 percent”, &nbsp;Asian Development Bank quoted in Taiwan News, 9 Apr 2013, Online http://www.taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_content.php?id=2192013</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="9"></a>2] <i>The Index of Consumer Confidence for Taiwan was below the neutral point for 3 consecutive cycles previously (2011 H2: 30.1 index points; 2012 H1: 25.7 index points; and 2012 H2: 33.1 index points).</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> KOREA: Consumers positive about job and economy<p>The acceleration of economic growth in Korea to a 2-year high during Q1 2013 (up 0.9% compared to 0.3% in Q4 2012) against a backdrop of lower inflationary pressure and stronger growth in exports, investments and the construction sector<sup>[<a href="#10">1</a>]</sup> helped set the stage for a generally more upbeat sentiment among Korean consumers in the latest survey. The overall index gained 14.8 index points to 53.5 index points, with all 5 major indicators gaining traction, driven primarily by improved sentiment on employment (+18.9 index points), the economy (+16.6 index points) and quality of life (+13.5 index points).</p> <p>Chart 4:&nbsp; KOREA - Index Scores for 2010 H2 – 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender, Age &amp; Major Cities</p> <p><b></b><b></b></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart4MICCkorea.jpg"><img width="582" height="352" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart4MICCkorea.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="10"></a>1]&nbsp;<i>“South Korea’s economic growth accelerates”, Bank of Korea, http://eng.bok.or.kr/eng/engMain.action</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> CHINA: Overall sentiment retreated against slower economic growth momentum<p>The overall index of consumer confidence in China shed 4.9 index points from the last survey to 76.9 index points, with the indicator on Quality of Life (74.4 index points) exhibiting significant deterioration of -10.9 index points. However, consumers remained extremely optimistic about their regular income (92.8 index points), and highly positive on their employment and economic prospects (76.5 index points and 82.0 index points, respectively).</p> <p>Chart 5:&nbsp; CHINA - Index Scores for 2010 H2 – 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender, Age &amp; Major Cities</p> <p></p> <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart5MICCchina.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="540" height="327" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart5MICCchina.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> INDIA: Slight dip in overall sentiment; Lower inflationary pressure lending support<p>Compared to the last half-yearly survey, the overall index for India shed 3.5 index points to 82.0 index points. Softening inflationary pressure (the wholesale price index dropped to 4.89% YoY in March this year, the lowest since November 2009)<sup>[<a href="#11">1</a>]</sup> amid loose monetary policies geared towards reviving economic growth helped keep the sub-indexes for the major indicators at buoyant levels.&nbsp;</p> <p>With the exception of stock market and quality of life which shed 11.7 index points and 5.1 index points respectively, all other indicators remained relatively stable. The survey also found the male cohort to be the most optimistic about their regular income (92.6 index points), compared to the other indicators and also their female counterparts (87.2 index points).</p> <p>Chart 6:&nbsp; INDIA - Index Scores for 2010 H2 – 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender, Age &amp; Major Cities</p> <p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart6MICCindia.jpg"><img width="551" height="331" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart6MICCindia.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="11"></a>1]&nbsp;<i>“Subbarao’s RBI to “Take Note” as inflation eases to 41-month low”, Bloomberg Businessweek, 14 May 2013, Online http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-05-14/india-inflation-eases-to-41-month-low-adding-to-rate-cut-scope&nbsp;</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> VIETNAM: Economic slowdown a damper on sentiment<p>The interplay of a weaker property market and a credit slump which dampened corporate expansion and consumer spending<sup>[<a href="#12">1</a>]</sup> took a toll on consumer sentiment in Vietnam. The overall index declined by 16.1 index points from the previous survey to 58.4 index points with the sub-indexes for all major indicators taking a hit: stock market and regular income shed the most by 21.5 index points and 20.6 index points, respectively.&nbsp;</p> <p>Chart 7:&nbsp; VIETNAM - Index Scores for 2010 H2 – 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender, Age &amp; Major Cities<b></b></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart7MICCvietnam.jpg"><img width="528" height="363" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart7MICCvietnam.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="12"></a>1]&nbsp;<i>“Vietnam GDP growth slows in first quarter as banks struggle”, General Statistics Office quoted in Bloomberg News, 27 Mar 2013, Online</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> BANGLADESH: Sentiment stifled by slowdown in economy & political uncertainty <p>Compared to its regional peers, the index for Bangladesh declined the most, down 39.5 index points from the last survey to 22.2 index points, with sentiment on the economy and regular income both shedding 43.4 index points, followed by quality of life (-39.0 index points), employment (-38.7 index points), and stock market (-33.1 index points). The slowdown in economic growth dipped to a 4-year low of 6%, compounded by a series of strikes, the disaster-strewn garment sector and expected sluggish growth in the farming sector<sup>[<a href="#13">1</a>]</sup> which had imparted a major detrimental effect on overall consumer sentiment.</p> <p>Chart 8:&nbsp; BANGLADESH - Index Scores for 2010 H2 – 2013 H1 &amp; Breakdown by Gender, Age &amp; Major Cities</p> <p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart8MICCbangladash.jpg"><img width="575" height="348" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/chart8MICCbangladash.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[<a name="13"></a>1]&nbsp;<i>“Bangladesh economic growth slows to four-year low”, AFP.com, 17 May 2013, Online http://uk.news.yahoo.com/bangladesh-economic-growth-slows-four-063806436.html#sKuetXu&nbsp;</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> About the Author<p>Desmond Choong</p> <p>Desmond Choong is a business and market economist who specializes in providing research and business advisory services to clients in the areas of economic and market modeling with a key focus on Asia/Pacific and the African &amp; Middle East regions. In the past twelve years, he has served as consultant to companies in financial services, manufacturing, logistics, energy, and the tourism industry. As a researcher, Desmond served as Fellow at the American Institute of Economic Research and taught International Trade at Boston University. Desmond holds a B.A. in English/Economics from Boston College and a M.A. in Political Economics from Boston University, MA, USA.</p> <p></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/reports/2013/mastercard-index-of-consumer-confidence-report-2013h1-asiapacific2012-12-31T16:00:00.000Z2012-12-31T16:00:00.000ZMasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence Introduction: About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 7 November to 23 December 2012. A total of 11,339 respondents aged 18 – 64 were surveyed in the 25 markets.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MARKETS-H1H2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MARKETS-H1H2.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> Summary<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) measures consumer confidence /sentiments on prevailing expectation in the market for the next six months. It is the average of the Index Scores of FIVE Economic Factors: Employment; Economy; Regular Income; Stock Market and Quality of Life.</p> <p>This is the 40th MWICC for MasterCard's Asia/Pacific Region.&nbsp; The MWICC continues to assess consumer sentiments over the next six months in each of the twenty five selected markets in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa, and provides a benchmark and mechanism to gather data for comparison with and to establish historical trends in the two MasterCard Regions.</p> <p>Overview</p> <p>From Weber Shandwick Press Releases</p> <p></p> Australia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-AUST.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="516" height="387" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-AUST.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> China<p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-CHINA.jpg"><img width="506" height="378" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-CHINA.jpg"></a></p> Hong Kong<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-HK.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="465" height="349" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-HK.jpg"></a></p> India<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDIA.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="495" height="371" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDIA.jpg"></a></p> Indonesia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDO.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="507" height="379" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDO.jpg"></a></p> Japan<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-JAPAN.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="546" height="409" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-JAPAN.jpg"></a></p> Korea<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-KOREA.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="525" height="395" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-KOREA.jpg"></a></p> Malaysia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MALAYSIA.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="473" height="355" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MALAYSIA.jpg"></a></p> New Zealand<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-NZ.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="527" height="396" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-NZ.jpg"></a></p> Philippines<p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-PHYLIPPINES.jpg"><img width="520" height="391" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-PHYLIPPINES.jpg"></a></p> Singapore<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-SINGAPORE.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-SINGAPORE.jpg"></a></p> Taiwan<p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-TAIWAN.jpg"><img width="554" height="417" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-TAIWAN.jpg"></a></p> Thailand<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-THAILAND.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="545" height="406" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-THAILAND.jpg"></a></p> Vietnam<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-VIETNAM.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="540" height="405" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-VIETNAM.jpg"></a></p> Bangladesh<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-BANGLADESH.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="527" height="397" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-BANGLADESH.jpg"></a></p> Myanmar<p><a target="_blank" href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MYANMAR.jpg"><img width="499" height="376" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MYANMAR.jpg"></a></p> The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/reports/2012/mastercard-worldwide-index-of-consumer-confidence2011-12-31T16:00:00.000Z2011-12-31T16:00:00.000ZMasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence H2 2012 Introduction: About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 7 November to 23 December 2012. A total of 11,339 respondents aged 18 – 64 were surveyed in the 25 markets.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MARKETLEVELH1H22013.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MARKETLEVELH1H22013.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> Summary<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) measures consumer confidence /sentiments on prevailing expectation in the market for the next six months. It is the average of the Index Scores of FIVE Economic Factors: Employment; Economy; Regular Income; Stock Market and Quality of Life.</p> <p>This is the 40th MWICC for MasterCard's Asia/Pacific Region.&nbsp; The MWICC continues to assess consumer sentiments over the next six months in each of the twenty five selected markets in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa, and provides a benchmark and mechanism to gather data for comparison with and to establish historical trends in the two MasterCard Regions.</p> <p>Overview</p> <p>From Weber Shandwick Press Releases</p> <p></p> Australia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-AUST2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="502" height="377" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-AUST2.jpg"></a></p> China<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-CHINA2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="511" height="382" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-CHINA2.jpg"></a></p> Hong Kong<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-HK2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="507" height="380" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-HK2.jpg"></a></p> India<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDIA2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="506" height="379" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDIA2.jpg"></a></p> Indonesia <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDO2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="505" height="378" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-INDO2.jpg"></a></p> Japan<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-JAPAN2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="502" height="376" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-JAPAN2.jpg"></a></p> Korea <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-KOREA2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="503" height="378" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-KOREA2.jpg"></a></p> Malaysia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MALAY2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="504" height="379" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MALAY2.jpg"></a></p> New Zealand<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-NZ2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="503" height="378" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-NZ2.jpg"></a></p> Philippines<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-NZ2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="504" height="379" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-NZ2.jpg"></a></p> Singapore<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-SPORE2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="486" height="294" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-SPORE2.jpg"></a></p> Taiwan<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-TAIWAN2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="503" height="379" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-TAIWAN2.jpg"></a></p> Thailand<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-THAI2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="504" height="376" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-THAI2.jpg"></a></p> Vietnam<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-VIET2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="507" height="380" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-VIET2.jpg"></a></p> Bangladesh<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-BANGLA2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="505" height="380" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-BANGLA2.jpg"></a></p> Myanmar<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MYANMAR2.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="507" height="383" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/MWICC-MYANMAR2.jpg"></a></p> The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/reports/2012/mastercard-worldwide-index-of-consumer-confidence-h2-20122012-06-30T16:00:00.000Z2012-06-30T16:00:00.000ZMasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence- H2 2011 Introduction<p>&nbsp;<br> </p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence-one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong's unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 5 December 2011 to 8 February 2012. A total of 12,915 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> Market Level Comparison<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/MarketLevelComparison.jpg" target="_blank"><img style="width: 353px; height: 241px;" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/MarketLevelComparison.jpg"></a></p> Summary<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) measures consumer confidence /sentiments on prevailing expectation in the market for the next six months. It is the average of the Index Scores of FIVE Economic Factors: Employment; Economy; Regular Income; Stock Market and Quality of Life.</p> <p>This is the thirty-eighth MWICC for MasterCard's Asia/Pacific Region and fifteenth for the Middle East and fourth for the Africa Region.&nbsp; The MWICC continues to assess consumer sentiments over the next six months in each of the twenty five selected markets and provides a benchmark and mechanism to gather data for comparison with and to establish historical trends in the two MasterCard Regions.</p> <p>Overview<br> From Weber Shandwick Press Releases</p> <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Summary.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Summary.jpg"></a></p> Australia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Australia.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Australia.jpg"></a></p> China<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/China.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/China.jpg"></a></p> Hong Kong<p><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/HongKong.jpg"></p> india<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/India.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/India.jpg"></a></p> indonesia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Indonesia.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Indonesia.jpg"></a></p> japan<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Japan.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Japan.jpg"></a></p> korea<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Korea.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Korea.jpg"></a></p> malaysia<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Malaysia.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Malaysia.jpg"></a></p> new zealand<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/NewZealand.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/NewZealand.jpg"></a></p> philippines<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Philippines.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Philippines.jpg"></a></p> singapore<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Singapore.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Singapore.jpg"></a></p> taiwan<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Taiwan.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Taiwan.jpg"></a></p> thailand<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Thailand.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Thailand.jpg"></a></p> vietnam<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Vietnam.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/Vietnam.jpg"></a></p> The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/reports/2011/mastercard-worldwide-index-of-consumer-confidence-h220112011-06-30T16:00:00.000Z2011-06-30T16:00:00.000ZMasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence- H1 2011 Introduction<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Survey on Consumer Confidence (MWICC) for Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa is released once a year.&nbsp;</p> <p>The MasterCard Survey on Consumer Confidence is released once a year and provides valuable insights into consumers' confidence for the six months ahead. The latest survey was conducted from March to April 2011 and involved&nbsp; 17,620 consumers from across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Data collection was via online, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.</p> <p>The survey is designed to gauge the perceptions of people who have the experience and means of engaging in a wide spectrum of economic activities, which dictate the performance of the national economy. Thus, the basic requirement to qualify as a respondent is that he/she owns a bank account and is between 18 to 64 years old..&nbsp; These requirements provide a feasible mechanism to maximize the inclusion of people who belong to the middle and upper income groups who are most likely to have disposable income in excess of spending on necessities and play a significant role in the performance of the consumer market and the economy.</p> <p>The distribution of age and sex of the middle and upper income groups in each market is taken into consideration when designing the sampling frame.&nbsp; A standard minimum income is not used to qualify the respondents across all the markets covered in this survey due to difference in purchasing power parity and differing levels of income required to qualify for a credit card.&nbsp; To ensure consistency and comparability with the sample in previous studies, a quota based on sex and age is applied.</p> <p>Face-to-Face Interviews, Standard Telephone Interviews, and Computer Aided Telephone Interviews (CATI) were used.</p> Market Level Comparison<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/MasterCardWorldwideIndexofConsumerConfidenceH12011.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="412" height="309" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/MasterCardWorldwideIndexofConsumerConfidenceH12011.jpg"></a></p> Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/MasterCardWorldwideIndexofConsumerConfidenceH120112.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="404" height="2501" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/reports/MasterCardWorldwideIndexofConsumerConfidenceH120112.jpg"></a></p> The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/reports/2011/mastercard-worldwide-index-of-consumer-confidence-h1-20112010-12-31T16:00:00.000Z2010-12-31T16:00:00.000ZEarthquake Effect Bites as Consumer Confidence Wanes in Asia/Pacific: New MasterCard Index Georgette Tan, Robert O’Brien Asia/Pacific rocked by Japan, NZ earthquakes<p>Overall confidence in the Economy in the Asia/Pacific region fell from 70.6 to 59.1, with Employment down from 67.5 to 59.9. Confidence also fell among consumers on the key indicator of Quality of Life (from 64.7 to 57.0) and the Stock Market (from 65.8 to 58.1), but increased slightly on Regular Income (from 71.6 to 73.1).</p> <p>Japan and New Zealand, both still recovering from devastating earthquakes this year, experienced declines in consumer confidence across most key indicators, with New Zealand’s overall confidence falling from a positive 53.3 in the previous six months to a pessimistic 42.2, with a strong decline in confidence in the Economy (from 53.1 to 35.1). Japan’s overall consumer confidence was at its lowest since 2002, with confidence in the Economy falling from 20.6 six months ago to 12.3 and confidence in Employment down from 21.8 to 13.3.</p> <p>Steep falls in consumer confidence were found in the Philippines, where optimism fell from 80.1 to 53.6 over the last six months, and across all key indicators, most dramatically in Employment (80.0 to 45.3), Qualify of Life (80.5 to 46.7) and the Economy (83.6 to 54.0).</p> <p>“While consumer attitudes remain overwhelmingly positive across this Index there is clearly a perception that the recovery from the financial crisis is not going as smoothly as people would like,” said Yuwa Hedrick-Wong, global economic advisor for MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>“Consumers are fantastic barometers of economic performance. As parts of the world have endured six very difficult months dealing with natural disasters, political instability and with ongoing financial uncertainty across the Eurozone, it is no surprise to see consumer sentiment declining across some of these markets.” &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <table width="571" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Australia</td> <td>63.1</td> <td>63.0</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>69.5</td> <td>24.1</td> </tr><tr><td>China</td> <td>78.3</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>83.0</td> <td>85.3</td> <td>60.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Hong Kong</td> <td>69.9</td> <td>74.7</td> <td>76.6</td> <td>60.0</td> <td>24.7</td> </tr><tr><td>India</td> <td>75.2</td> <td>73.0</td> <td>68.2</td> <td>68.8</td> <td>68.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Indonesia</td> <td>58.0</td> <td>56.1</td> <td>61.4</td> <td>67.0</td> <td>49.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Japan</td> <td>15.9</td> <td>20.2</td> <td>27.8</td> <td>24.4</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>South Korea</td> <td>51.8</td> <td>55.7</td> <td>54.1</td> <td>59.8</td> <td>28.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Malaysia</td> <td>64.9</td> <td>66.2</td> <td>67.9</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>27.8</td> </tr><tr><td>New Zealand</td> <td>42.2</td> <td>53.3</td> <td>65.9</td> <td>69.7</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Philippines</td> <td>53.6</td> <td>80.1</td> <td>59.3</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>40.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Singapore</td> <td>77.9</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>86.6</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>31.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Taiwan</td> <td>67.6</td> <td>62.5</td> <td>65.7</td> <td>56.5</td> <td>39.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Thailand</td> <td>46.1</td> <td>57.3</td> <td>50.6</td> <td>55.3</td> <td>23.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Vietnam</td> <td>77.1</td> <td>90.3</td> <td>93.7</td> <td>90.0&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> </td> <td>60.9</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Asia/Pacific</td> <td>61.5</td> <td>68.0</td> <td>69.1</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>38.7</td> </tr></tbody></table> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has an 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and is now conducted annually. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011. A total of 17,620 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p></p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> <p></p> <p></p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/earthquake-effects-bites-as-consumer-confidence-wanes-in-asia-pacific2011-06-22T16:00:00.000Z2011-06-22T16:00:00.000ZOptimistic Outlook Holds Steady Amongst Respondents in Asia/Pacific Region: MasterCard About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 17-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region. &nbsp;In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty-four markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 15 March to 12 April 2010. A total of 10,503 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 24 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite of research products in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the flagship MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, and the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Purchasing Resilience, both of which are released six monthly, and MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, which is released annually.</p> <p>Besides these, MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports; the series represents in part its ongoing research and analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 70 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by its Asia/Pacific economist, Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p>The MasterCard Indexes and Insights reports are available at <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/">www.masterintelligence.com</a></p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p>MasterCard Worldwide advances global commerce by providing a critical economic link among financial institutions, businesses, cardholders and merchants worldwide. &nbsp;As a franchisor, processor and advisor, MasterCard develops and markets payment solutions, processes over 22 billion transactions each year, and provides industry-leading analysis and consulting services to financial-institution customers and merchants. &nbsp;Powered by the MasterCard Worldwide Network and through its family of brands, including MasterCard®, Maestro® and Cirrus®, MasterCard serves consumers and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. &nbsp;For more information go to <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/">www.mastercard.com</a>. &nbsp;Follow us on Twitter:<a href="http://twitter.com/mastercardnews">@mastercardnews</a>.</p> Contact<p>Dhania Nair,<br> <u>dnair@webershandwick.com</u>,<br> 65 6825 8035</p> <p>Eugenia Koh,<br> <u>ekoh@webershandwick.com</u>,<br> 65 6825 8029</p> MASTERCARD WORLDWIDE INDEX OF CONSUMER CONFIDENCE 2H 2010 MARKET FINDINGS: <p><b><u>ASIA/PACIFIC MARKETS</u></b></p> <p><b>AUSTRALIA (74.1)</b></p> <p>Australians are optimistic in their outlook for the next six months. Their Index score is higher than that of six months ago (69.5) and much higher than a year ago (24.1).</p> <p>Consumers are more optimistic than they were six months ago about the Stock Market (82.1 vs. 79.9 six months ago), Regular Income (77.3 vs. 68.0) and Employment (78.2 vs. 65.2). Outlook on the other indicators have declined from six months ago: Quality of Life (55.8 vs 56.2) and the Economy (76.9 vs 78.3).</p> <p><b>CHINA (83.0)</b></p> <p>Consumers in China are slightly less optimistic about the next six months than they were six months ago (85.3) but more optimistic than a year ago (60.8). However, this is significantly higher than the Asia/Pacific region average (69.1).</p> <p>Consumers are more optimistic than they were six months ago about Regular Income (88.0 vs. 87.5). However, the outlook on the other indicators have declined from six months ago: Quality of Life (89.2 vs 92.4), the Stock Market (67.9 vs. 74.2), the Economy (90.3 vs 92.5).The outlook on Employment remained the same as six months ago, at 79.8.</p> <p><b>HONG KONG (76.6)</b></p> <p>Consumers in Hong Kong have become much more optimistic, registering a hike in consumer confidence scores from six months ago (60.0) and a year ago (24.7).</p> <p>Consumer sentiment is optimistic for the Economy (83.8 vs 68.3 six months ago), Employment (83.3 vs 67.4), the Stock Market (79.2 vs 63.2), Regular Income (75.0 vs 53.2) and Quality of Life (61.7 vs 48.0).</p> <p><b>INDIA (68.2)</b></p> <p>Consumers in India are slightly less optimistic than six months ago (68.8) and slightly more optimistic than a year ago (68.0).</p> <p>Consumers are more optimistic than they were six months ago about the Stock Market (70.2 vs. 70.0) and Regular Income (74.0 vs 70.5). However, the outlook on the other indicators has declined slightly from six months ago: Quality of Life (67.3 vs 69.8), the Economy (64.5 vs 66.7) and Employment (65.0 vs 66.9).</p> <p><b>INDONESIA (61.4)</b></p> <p>Indonesian consumers have become less optimistic about the next six months compared to six months ago (67.0) but are more optimistic than a year ago (49.2).</p> <p>Consumers are more optimistic than they were six months ago about the Stock Market (68.4 vs. 64.4). However, the outlook on the other indicators has declined from six months ago: Quality of Life (59.7 vs. 61.7), Regular Income (73.5 vs. 74.3), Economy (56.6 vs 69.9) and Employment (49.0 vs. 64.4).</p> <p><b>JAPAN (27.8)</b></p> <p>Japanese consumers are less pessimistic than they were six months ago (27.8 vs. 24.4). However, their index score continued to be significantly lower than the Asia/Pacific region average (69.1).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments towards the Stock Market (44.1 vs. 36.6), Regular Income (17.4 vs. 13.5), Economy (37.0 vs. 34.2) and Employment (29.7 vs 23.6) have improved from six months ago. Consumers are less optimistic about the Quality of Life (11.0 vs. 14.3).</p> <p><b>KOREA (54.1)</b></p> <p>Korean consumers have become less optimistic in their outlook compared to six months ago (59.8) but are much more optimistic than a year ago (28.8).</p> <p>Consumer are less optimistic than they were six months ago about the Quality of Life (44.9 vs. 52.2), Stock Market (63.5 vs. 64.0), Regular Income (59.7 vs. 70.5), Economy (58.2 vs 63.5) and Employment (44.3 vs 48.6).</p> <p><b>MALAYSIA (67.9)</b></p> <p>Malaysians are more optimistic in their outlook for the next six months. Their Index score is slightly higher than that of six months ago (66.3) and much higher than a year ago (27.8).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments towards the Stock Market (68.6 vs. 64.9) and Regular Income (71.7 vs. 63.5) have improved from six months ago. Consumers are less optimistic about the Quality of Life (64.7 vs. 66.0), Economy (69.6 vs. 70.0) and Employment (64.8 vs. 67.0).</p> <p><b>NEW ZEALAND (65.9)</b></p> <p>Consumer confidence in New Zealand has decreased, with consumers becoming less optimistic in their outlook compared to six months ago (69.7). However, they continue to remain much more optimistic than a year ago (21.5).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments towards Regular Income (71.3 vs. 66.7) and Employment (74.1 vs. 72.6) have improved from six months ago. Consumers are less optimistic about the Quality of Life (48.0 vs 51.1), the Stock Market (65.9 vs 76.6) and the Economy (70.2 vs 81.4).</p> <p><b>PHILIPPINES (59.3)</b></p> <p>Consumer confidence in the Philippines has improved from six months ago (49.7) and a year ago (40.5).</p> <p>Consumers have become more optimistic in their outlook towards Regular Income (84.6 vs. 69.9 six months ago), the Stock Market (50.0 vs. 47.3), the Economy (58.0 vs. 46.4), Employment (53.7 vs. 43.4) and Quality of Life (50.2 vs. 41.8).</p> <p><b>SINGAPORE (86.6)</b></p> <p>Singaporean consumers have become more optimistic compared to six months ago (79.4) and a year ago (31.2).</p> <p>Consumers are optimistic with improvements in all five indicators compared to six months ago. They are more optimistic in their outlook towards the Economy (95.5 vs. 89.7), Employment (94.0 vs. 86.5), the Stock Market (83.2 vs. 80.6), Quality of Life (75.8 vs. 72.7) and Regular Income (84.3 vs. 67.5).</p> <p><b>TAIWAN (65.7)</b></p> <p>Taiwanese consumers have become less pessimistic compared to six months ago (56.5) and a year ago (39.4).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments have become more optimistic in almost all indicators compared to six months ago: Economy (73.5 vs. 60.5), Employment (72.1 vs. 57.0), Regular Income (64.3 vs. 47.2) and Quality of Life (49.2 vs. 43.1). They are, however, more pessimistic about the Stock Market (69.6 vs. 74.7).</p> <p><b>THAILAND (50.6)</b></p> <p>Thai consumers have become more pessimistic compared to the last six months (55.3), but still more optimistic than a year ago (23.0).</p> <p>Sentiments towards the Economy (52.3 vs. 61.9), Stock Market (51.8 vs. 59.8), Employment (49.5 vs. 56.1) and Quality of Life (36.7 vs. 47.6) have worsened from six months ago, except for Regular Income (62.7 vs. 51.2), which has become more positive.</p> <p><b>VIETNAM (93.7)</b></p> <p>The Index score for Vietnam is slightly higher than six months ago (90.0) and significantly so one year ago (60.9). They are the most optimistic across all markets in the Asia/Pacific region.</p> <p>Consumers have become more optimistic across all five indicators compared to six months ago: Quality of Life (95.7 vs. 92.5), Economy (96.2 vs. 92.3), Regular Income (96.0 vs. 91.9), Employment (97.0 vs. 91.3) and the Stock Market (83.6 vs. 82.1).</p> <p><b><u>MIDDLE EAST MARKETS</u></b></p> <p><b>EGYPT (45.5)</b></p> <p>Consumers in Egypt have become more pessimistic compared to the last six months (59.5) but are still more optimistic than a year ago (32.3).</p> <p>Consumer confidence in Egypt has worsened across all economic indicators in terms of outlook towards Regular Income (65.3 vs. 78.1 six months ago), Economy (41.9 vs. 58.1), Quality of Life (39.0 vs. 56.4), the Stock Market (39.8 vs. 54.5) and Employment (41.5 vs. 50.6).</p> <p><b>KUWAIT (96.9)</b></p> <p>Consumers in Kuwait have become much more optimistic, with a significant increase in consumer confidence scores from six months ago (70.9) and a year ago (49.5).</p> <p>Consumers have become much more optimistic compared with six months ago in the areas of Regular Income (98.9 vs. 82.0), the Stock Market (94.8 vs. 71.2), Employment (96.2 vs. 71.0), Economy (97.5 vs. 69.4) and Quality of Life (97.3 vs. 61.0).</p> <p><b>LEBANON (44.6)</b></p> <p>Lebanese consumers have become increasingly pessimistic compared to six months ago (55.4) and a year ago (64.4).</p> <p>Consumers are more pessimistic in their outlook towards Quality of Life (43.6 vs. 57.5 six months ago), the Stock Market (45.4 vs. 56.5), Regular Income (49.8 vs. 54.7), Economy (42.6 vs. 54.5) and Employment (41.8 vs. 54.0).</p> <p><b>QATAR (65.8)</b></p> <p>Consumers in Qatar have become much less optimistic than six months ago (89.2) and a year ago (71.4).</p> <p>Compared to six months ago, consumer confidence has improved slightly only towards Employment (85.5 vs. 85.2). On the other hand, consumers are much more pessimistic about the Quality of Life (57.5 vs. 91.8), the Stock Market (49.6 vs. 86.3), Regular Income (47.1 vs. 91.8) and the Economy (89.3 vs. 90.8),</p> <p><b>SAUDI ARABIA (85.0)</b></p> <p>Saudi Arabia’s Index score has increased from six months ago (83.2) and a year ago (67.1).</p> <p>Consumer confidence in the areas of Regular Income (93.3 vs. 92.3), Economy (86.9 vs. 85.7), Employment (92.2 vs. 85.0) and the Stock Market (66.7 vs. 63.0) has improved from the last six months, except for a decrease in the Quality of Life categrory (86.0 vs. 90.1).</p> <p><b>UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (82.4)</b></p> <p>Consumers in the UAE have become more pessimistic compared to the last six months (86.1), but still much more optimistic than a year ago (29.6).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments toward the Quality of Life (87.5 vs. 83.7) and Regular Income (86.8 vs. 81.9) have increased compared to six months ago but have decreased for the remaining three economic indicators: the Stock Market (72.6 vs. 89.6), Economy (83.0 vs. 89.4) and Employment (82.4 vs. 86.0).</p> <p><b><u>AFRICA MARKETS</u></b></p> <p><b>KENYA (73.5)</b></p> <p>Consumers in Kenya have become much more optimistic, with a significant increase in consumer confidence scores from six months ago (47.9), when the survey was first conducted in Kenya.</p> <p>Consumer confidence about Regular Income (88.5 vs. 61.7 six months ago), the Stock Market (73.9 vs. 51.4), the Economy (72.6 vs. 43.5), Employment (65.6 vs. 42.7) and Quality of Life (67.0 vs. 40.1) have all increased.</p> <p><b>MOROCCO (78.2)</b></p> <p>Consumers in Morocco have become optimistic in the next six months when compared to six months ago (66.1), when the survey was first conducted in Morocco.</p> <p>Moroccan consumers are generally more optimistic across all five economic indicators, Regular Income (90.9 vs. 80.7), the Stock Market (71.9 vs. 64.0), Economy (78.3 vs. 63.1), Quality of Life (72.9 vs. 61.8) and Employment (77.2 vs. 60.8).</p> <p><b>NIGERIA (83.2)</b></p> <p>Nigerian consumers are more pessimistic when compared to the last six months (89.4) when they survey was first conducted in Nigeria.</p> <p>Consumers in Nigeria have become less optimistic across all five economic indicators, Regular Income (95.6 vs. 96.6), Quality of Life (85.0 vs. 93.8), Economy (79.4 vs. 90.2), Employment (81.7 vs. 90.0) and the Stock Market (74.4 vs. 76.6).</p> <p><b>SOUTH AFRICA (58.6)</b></p> <p>Consumers in South Africa are less confident about the next six months than they were six months ago (59.8) and a year ago (67.3).</p> <p>South African consumers are less optimistic than six months ago across three economic indicators: Quality of Life (55.8 vs. 56.9 six months ago), Employment (53.2 vs. 53.7) and the Stock Market (55.2 vs. 62.6). The remaining two economic indications, Regular Income (68.3 vs. 66.8) and the Economy (60.4 vs. 59.0), saw slight spikes in confidence.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2010/optimistic-outlook-holds-steady-amongst-respondents-in-asia-paci2010-05-17T16:00:00.000Z2010-05-17T16:00:00.000ZConsumers across Asia/Pacific Continue to Remain Cautiously Optimistic: MasterCard Survey <p><b><i>Singapore, 01 December 2010</i></b> – Consumers continue to be optimistic in their sentiments, though cautiously so, according to the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence. Although experiencing a marginal dip from the last survey, the latest Index score for consumer confidence is the second highest across the region in the last two years.</p> <p>Now in its 18<sup>th</sup> year, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. Released twice a year, the Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; The latest survey was conducted from 13 September to 11 November 2010 and involved 10,502 consumers from 24 markets<a href="#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1"></a><sup>[1]</sup>. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p>Across Asia/Pacific, which comprises 14 markets, overall consumer confidence remained modestly optimistic with an Index score of 68, marginally lower than six months ago (69.1) but higher than a year ago (66.3), when the region was beginning to recover from the effects of the global financial crisis. Among the five survey indicators, respondents seemed most optimistic about Regular Income (71.6), less so than six months ago (73.5) but more than a year ago (65.5). They were least optimistic about Quality of Life (64.7), although this is the highest score the indicator has received in over two years, indicating a gradual return to pre-crisis levels (66.7 for the survey of late 2007).</p> <p>Consumers’ perceptions about the Economy (70.6) have become marginally less positive compared to six months ago (72.6) and a year ago (71.4), but these scores above 70 are still the highest the region has seen in over five years. Similarly, the current score for the Employment indicator (67.5) is the second highest score the region has seen in the last five years. With regard to the Stock Market performance (65.8), consumers’ outlook is less positive than six months ago (68.3) and a year ago (67.5).</p> <p>“The scores indicate that while consumers may perceive the worst of the crisis as behind them, they are still wary in their outlook for the months ahead,” said Yvette Oh, group executive, Market Development, Asia/Pacific, Middle East &amp; Africa, MasterCard Worldwide. “This perception could be in large part due to the uncertainties caused by inflation, the various tightening measures that governments across the region are implementing, and the general slowdown in growth that the region is seeing post-crisis. Nevertheless, it is encouraging to see that consumer perceptions about the Economy, Employment and Quality of Life are among the most positive in recent years.”</p> <p>Respondents from Vietnam are the most optimistic (90.3) in the region, followed by those from Singapore (86.1) and the Philippines (80.1). Respondents from Japan (20.2) continue to look at the months ahead with pessimism, even more so than six months ago (27.8) and a year ago (24.4). Consumer sentiment in New Zealand, although marginally optimistic (53.3), has taken a turn for the worse after two consecutive waves of higher optimism (65.9 six months ago and 69.7 a year ago).</p> <p>Growth engines of the region China (79.4) and India (73.0) continue to remain positive in their outlook, although scores for China are lower than six months ago (83.0) and a year ago (85.3). This decrease is influenced by lower scores across all five indicators, with the Employment indicator seeing the highest drop in scores (71.2 vs. 79.8 six months ago). Scores in India, on the other hand, have risen (68.2 six months ago and 68.8 a year ago), bolstered by an increase in optimism across all five indicators measured.</p> <p>Consumer sentiment in Thailand is at its most positive (57.3) in the last four years, while in the Philippines (80.1), this is the most positive consumers have been since 1997. Filipino respondents’ outlook on their Quality of Life (80.5) and the Economy (83.6) are the highest ever scores recorded since the Philippines was included in the survey in 1995.</p> <p>Elsewhere, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence in the Middle East and Africa showed increases in scores compared to six months ago. Across the Middle East, overall consumer confidence has gone up marginally (71.6 vs. 69.2 six months ago). Respondents were most optimistic about Regular Income (83.0) and least optimistic about the Stock Market (63.2). At a market level, Saudi Arabia (95.1) and Qatar (83.6) top list in overall Consumer Confidence, with Saudi Arabia seeing the highest score in three years.</p> <p>The overall consumer confidence score across the four Africa markets surveyed increased to 79 from 73.7 six months ago, bolstered primarily by substantial increase in optimism in Nigeria (94.3 vs. 83.2 six months ago) and Kenya (87.3 vs. 73.5). Morocco (65.3), however, saw a significant drop in it consumer confidence score from six months ago (78.2), while the score for South Africa dipped to 54.7, the lowest in the market ever since it was incorporated into the survey in 2003.<br> </p> <ul> <li><b><i>More information on the Index can be found at the website <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com">www.masterintelligence.com</a></i></b></li> </ul> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a href="#_ftnref1" name="_ftn1"></a><b><i><sup>[1]</sup></i></b><i>Asia/Pacific: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand,&nbsp; and Vietnam<br> Middle East:&nbsp; Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates<br> Africa: Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa</i></p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="1" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description">MARKETS</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2010</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2010</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2009</th> </tr><tr><td>Australia</td> <td>63.0</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>69.5</td> <td>24.1</td> </tr><tr><td>China</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>83.0</td> <td>85.3</td> <td>60.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Hong Kong</td> <td>74.7</td> <td>76.6</td> <td>60.0</td> <td>24.7</td> </tr><tr><td>India</td> <td>73.0</td> <td>68.2</td> <td>68.8</td> <td>68.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Indonesia</td> <td>56.1</td> <td>61.4</td> <td>67.0</td> <td>49.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Japan</td> <td>20.2</td> <td>27.8</td> <td>24.4</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>South Korea</td> <td>55.7</td> <td>54.1</td> <td>59.8</td> <td>28.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Malaysia</td> <td>66.2</td> <td>67.9</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>27.8</td> </tr><tr><td>New Zealand</td> <td>53.3</td> <td>65.9</td> <td>69.7</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Philippines</td> <td>80.1</td> <td>59.3</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>40.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Singapore</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>86.6</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>31.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Taiwan</td> <td>62.5</td> <td>65.7</td> <td>56.5</td> <td>39.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Thailand</td> <td>57.3</td> <td>50.6</td> <td>55.3</td> <td>23.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Vietnam</td> <td>90.3</td> <td>93.7</td> <td>90.0</td> <td>60.9</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Total Asia/Pacific</b></td> <td>68.0</td> <td>69.1</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>38.7</td> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.3</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.1</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Total Middle East</b></td> <td>71.6</td> <td>69.2</td> <td>74.5</td> <td>49.9</td> </tr><tr><td>Kenya</td> <td>87.3</td> <td>73.5</td> <td>47.9</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Morocco</td> <td>65.3</td> <td>78.2</td> <td>66.1</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Nigeria</td> <td>94.3</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>89.4</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>South Africa</td> <td>54.7</td> <td>58.6</td> <td>59.8</td> <td>67.3</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Total Africa</b></td> <td>79.0</td> <td>73.7</td> <td>66.4</td> <td>-</td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>&nbsp;</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has an 18-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty-four markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 13 September to 11 November 2010. A total of 10,502 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 24 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite of research products in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the flagship MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, and the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Purchasing Resilience, both of which are released six monthly, and the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement and the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Online Shopping, which are released annually. In addition to the Index properties, MasterCard’s suite of research properties includes the MasterCard Worldwide Survey on Consumer Purchasing Priorities, released six monthly, and the MasterCard Worldwide Survey on Ethical Spending Behavior, released annually.</p> <p>Besides these, MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports; the series represents in part its ongoing research and analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 70 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by its Asia/Pacific economist, Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p>The MasterCard Indexes and Insights reports are available at <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/">www.masterintelligence.com</a></p> About MasterCard Worldwide <p>As a leading global payments company, MasterCard Worldwide prides itself on being at the heart of commerce, helping to make life easier and more efficient for everyone, everywhere.&nbsp; MasterCard serves as a franchisor, processor and advisor to the payments industry, and makes commerce happen by providing a critical economic link among financial institutions, governments, businesses, merchants, and cardholders worldwide.&nbsp; In 2009, $2.5 trillion in gross dollar volume was generated on its products by consumers around the world.&nbsp; Powered by the MasterCard Worldwide Network – the fastest payment processing network in the world – MasterCard processes over 22 billion transactions each year,&nbsp; has the capacity to handle 140 million transactions per hour, with an average network response time of 140 milliseconds and with 99.99 percent reliability.&nbsp; MasterCard advances global commerce through its family of brands, including MasterCard®, Maestro®, and Cirrus®; its suite of core products such as credit, debit, and prepaid; and its innovative platforms and functionalities, such as <i>MasterCard PayPass</i>™ and <i>MasterCard inControl</i>™.&nbsp; MasterCard serves consumers, governments, and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. For more information, please visit us at www.mastercard.com. Follow us on Twitter: @mastercardnews.&nbsp; </p> Contact<p>Georgette Tan,<br> MasterCard Worldwide,<br> +65 6390 5971, <a target="_blank" href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com"><br> georgette_tan@mastercard.com</a></p> <p>Cindy Choo,<br> Weber Shandwick,<br> +65 6825 8035, <br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:cchoo@webershandwick.com">cchoo@webershandwick.com</a>&nbsp; </p> MASTERCARD WORLDWIDE INDEX OF CONSUMER CONFIDENCE 1H 2011 MARKET FINDINGS <p><b><u>ASIA/PACIFIC MARKETS</u></b></p> <p><b>AUSTRALIA (63.0)</b><br> Australians have become less optimistic about the next six months compared to six months ago (74.1) as well as a year ago (69.5).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments for all indicators – Quality of Life (45.8 vs. 55.8 six months ago), Stock Market (65.4 vs. 82.1), Regular Income (66.4 vs. 77.3), Economy (66.7 vs. 76.9) and Employment (70.7 vs. 78.2) have declined significantly from six months ago.</p> <p><b>CHINA (79.4)</b><br> Consumer in China are slightly less optimistic than they were six months ago (83.0) but significantly more optimistic than the Asia/Pacific region average of 68.0.</p> <p>Consumer sentiments are less positive than they were six months ago towards Quality of Life (88.4 vs. 89.2 six months ago), Stock Market (65.5 vs. 67.9), Regular Income (85.1 vs. 88.0), Economy (86.8 vs. 90.3) and Employment (71.2 vs. 79.8).&nbsp; Although consumers are less optimistic, the Index scores are considerably higher than those recorded in the first half of 2009 during the global economic slowdown.</p> <p><b>HONG KONG (74.7)</b><br> Consumers in Hong Kong have become slightly less optimistic in their outlook for the next six months (74.7 vs. 76.6 six months ago). However, they continue to remain more optimistic than a year ago (60.0).</p> <p>Consumers are more optimistic than they were six months ago about the Regular Income (83.2 vs. 75.0 six months ago), the highest score recorded since 4H 2008. Conversely, the index scores for other indicators have dwindled when compared to six month ago –&nbsp; Quality of Life (57.7 vs. 61.7), Stock Market (74.1 vs. 79.2), Economy (77.9 vs. 83.8) and Employment (80.4 vs. 83.3).</p> <p><b>INDIA (73.0)</b><br> Consumer confidence in India has increased, with consumers becoming more positive in their outlook than six months ago (68.2) and a year ago (68.8). The latest survey result records the country’s highest Index score since the global economic downturn in the last quarter of 2008.</p> <p>Consumers are more optimistic than they were six months ago about the Quality of Life (71.3 vs. 67.3 six months ago), Stock Market (75.1 vs. 70.2), Regular Income (75.4 vs. 74.0), Economy (72.2 vs. 64.5) and Employment (70.8 vs. 65.0).</p> <p><b>INDONESIA (56.1)</b><br> Indonesian consumers have become less optimistic about the next six months compared to six months ago (61.4) and a year ago (67.0).</p> <p>The drop in the Index score is attributed by the less positivity displayed by the consumers in their outlook towards Quality of Life (51.9 vs. 59.7 six months ago), Stock Market (62.7 vs. 68.4), Economy (46.0 vs. 56.6) and Employment (41.3 vs. 49.0). Consumer confidence for Regular Income on the other hand, has increased from 73.5 six months ago to 78.8 for the next six months.&nbsp; Nevertheless, the scores are noticeably higher than those tabulated in 4H 2008 for Employment (41.3 vs. 24.5 4H 2008), Economy (46.0 vs. 22.6), Stock Market (62.7 vs. 37.4) and Quality of Life (51.9 vs. 27.5), except for the slight decrease in Regular Income (78.8 vs. 79.7).</p> <p><b>JAPAN (20.2)</b><br> Consumer confidence in Japan has taken a dip as compared to six months ago (27.8). The country’s index score remains significantly lower than the Asia/Pacific region average Index score (68.0), and is the lowest score recorded in the past one year.</p> <p>Consumer sentiments towards the Stock Market (29.2 vs. 44.1 six months ago), Regular Income (16.3 vs. 17.4), Economy (20.6 vs. 37.0) and Employment (21.8 vs. 29.7) have declined from six months ago. Consumers are slightly more optimistic about the Quality of Life (13.0 vs. 11.0).</p> <p><b>KOREA (55.7)</b><br> Korean consumers have become slightly more optimistic in their outlook compared to six months ago (54.1) but are less positive than a year ago (59.8).</p> <p>Consumer are more optimistic than they were six months ago about the Quality of Life (48.6 vs. 44.9 six months ago), Regular Income (61.3 vs. 59.7), Employment (52.1 vs. 44.3). Consumer sentiment about the Stock Market (62.7 vs. 63.5 six months ago) and Economy (53.8 vs. 58.2) have become less positive than six months ago.</p> <p><b>MALAYSIA (66.2)</b><br> Consumer confidence in Malaysia for the next six months has slightly edged down compared to six months ago (66.2 vs. 67.9 six months ago). Despite the minute decrease, the country’s outlook for the next six months is significantly higher than the Index score recorded for the first half of 2009 (27.8).</p> <p>Consumer are less optimistic than they were six months ago about the Stock Market (66.2 vs 68.6 six months ago), Regular Income (62.9 vs.71.7) and Economy (66.2 vs. 69.6). With regard to the current score for Employment, consumers in Malaysia are marginally positive in their outlook than they were six months ago (65.9 vs. 64.8). Similarly, Malaysians are becoming more optimistic about the Quality of Life for the next six months (70.0) than six months ago (64.7).</p> <p><b>NEW ZEALAND (53.3)</b><br> Consumer confidence in New Zealand continues to drop from one year ago (69.7) and six months ago (65.9). Nonetheless, consumers in New Zealand are found to be more positive than they were in the first half of 2009.</p> <p>Consumers are substantially less optimistic in all five economic indicators than they were six months ago about the Quality of Life (38.8 vs. 48.0 six months ago), Stock Market (53.8 vs. 65.9), Regular Income (66.9 vs. 71.3), Economy (53.1 vs. 70.2) and Employment (53.8 vs. 74.1).</p> <p><b>PHILIPPINES (80.1)</b><br> Consumer confidence in the Philippines has jumped to 80.1 from 59.3 six months ago, the highest score recorded since the global economic crisis in 1997 (42.0, 4H 1997).</p> <p>The surge in the latest Consumer Confidence Index score is also reflected in the optimism reflected in Filipinos’ outlook on their Quality of Life (80.5 vs. 50.2 six months ago), Stock Market (75.0 vs. 50.0), Economy (83.6 vs. 58.0) and Employment (80.0 vs. 53.7). On the contrary, consumer sentiment toward Regular Income for the next six months slide marginally compared to six months ago (81.5 vs. 84.6).</p> <p><b>SINGAPORE (86.1)</b><br> Consumer sentiment in Singapore has become marginally less positive about the next six months than six months ago (86.1 vs. 86.6 six months ago), although respondents still remain strongly optimistic.</p> <p>Perceptions of Singaporeans have become slightly more positive about their Quality of life (77.7 vs. 75.8 six months ago) and Regular Income (86.2 vs. 84.3). Regarding the other three economic indicators, consumers are marginally less optimistic about the next six months than they were six months ago – Stock Market (82.5 vs. 83.2 six months ago), Economy (92.5 vs. 95.5) and Employment (91.5 vs. 94.0).</p> <p><b>TAIWAN (62.5)</b><br> Taiwanese are less optimistic about the next six months compared to six months ago (65.7), but are more optimistic than one year ago (56.5).</p> <p>While consumers perceptions are more optimistic towards the Quality of Life (57.6 vs. 49.2 six months ago) for the next six months, their confidence for Economy (65.3 vs. 73.5), Stock Market (65.4 vs. 69.6), Regular Income (61.9 vs. 64.3) and Employment (62.4 vs. 72.1) become more pessimistic than six months ago.</p> <p><b>THAILAND (57.3)</b><br> Consumer sentiment in Thailand has become more positive than six months ago (50.6), and a year ago (55.3), achieving its most positive score (57.3) in the last four years.</p> <p>Consumers responded with more positivity for the next six months towards their outlook for Quality of Life (48.4 vs. 36.7 six months ago), Stock Market (58.3 vs. 51.8), Economy (64.4 vs. 52.3) and Employment (56.7 vs. 49.5) compared to the last six months. Thai consumers are less optimistic about Regular Income for the next six months than they were six months ago (58.6 vs. 62.7).</p> <p><b>VIETNAM (90.3)</b><br> Although consumers are slightly less optimistic in their outlook for the next six months (90.3) than six months ago (93.7), they remain as the most positive consumers in the region.</p> <p>Consumer confidence in Thailand for Quality of Life (93.8 vs. 95.7 six months ago), Stock Market (81.7 vs. 83.6), Economy (88.4 vs. 96.2) and Employment (91.1 vs. 97.0) have decreased compared to six months ago. Regarding Regular income, Vietnamese consumers are slightly more optimistic the six months ahead than they were six months ago (96.3 vs. 96.0).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b><u>MIDDLE EAST MARKETS</u></b></p> <p><b>EGYPT (47.7)</b><br> Consumers in Egypt are marginally more optimistic about the next six months ahead compared to six months ago (45.5), however less optimistic than they were one year ago (59.5). Their latest consumer confidence Index score is the lowest amongst the six countries in Middle East.</p> <p>Consumers are becoming more positive than they were six months ago about the Regular Income (83.7 vs. 65.3). Despite this, consumers are less optimistic in their outlook towards Quality of Life (38.7 vs. 39.0 six months ago), Stock Market (37.2 vs. 39.8), Economy (39.7 vs. 41.9) and Employment (38.9 vs. 41.5) six months ahead.</p> <p><b>KUWAIT (80.4)</b><br> Kuwaitis are less optimistic in their outlook for the next six months, compared to six months ago (96.9), but they remain more optimistic than they were a year ago (70.9).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments towards the Quality of Life (86.4 vs. 97.3 six months ago), Stock Market (67.8 vs. 94.8), Regular Income (81.9 vs. 98.9), Economy (82.7 vs. 97.5) and Employment (83.2 vs. 96.2) for the next six months have decreased significantly compared to six months ago.</p> <p><b>LEBANON (54.3)</b><br> Consumers sentiment in Lebanon has swung back to positive sentiment (54.3) from 44.6 six months ago, at a level similar to where it was a year ago (55.4).</p> <p>Consumer sentiments for the next six months towards Quality of Life (45.8 vs. 43.6 six months ago), Stock Market (60.6 vs. 45.4), Regular Income (79.2 vs. 49.8) and Employment (53.6 vs. 41.8) have become more positive compared to six months ago, except Economy which has dropped from six months ago (32.1 vs. 42.6).</p> <p><b>QATAR (83.6)</b><br> Consumer confidence in Qatar has increased notably compared to six months ago (65.8), though not as optimistic as they were one year ago (89.2). Despite this, the significant spike in confidence could indicate a rebound in the economy.</p> <p>Consumer confidence for all five indicators for the next six months, Quality of Life (89.6 vs. 57.5 six months ago), Stock Market (60.9 vs. 49.6), Regular Income (86.4 vs. 47.1) and Employment (92.1 vs. 85.5), have all increased significantly compared to six months ago. Consumer sentiment towards the Economy has edged down from six months ago (89.1 vs. 89.3).</p> <p><b>SAUDI ARABIA (95.1)</b><br> Saudi Arabians are becoming more positive in their outlook for the next six months than they were six months ago (85.0), and a year ago (83.2). Further, the overall consumer confidence Index is the highest score the country scores in the last three years as well as the highest score among all the 24 markets surveyed.</p> <p>Consumer perception across all five economic indicators for the next six months has increased significantly compared to six months ago – Quality of Life&nbsp; (97.6 vs. 86.0 six months ago), Stock Market (83.4 vs. 66.7), Regular Income (96.8 vs. 93.3), Economy (98.5 vs. 86.9) and&nbsp; Employment (99.2&nbsp; vs. 92.2).</p> <p><b>UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (73.6)</b><br> Consumers in the United Arab Emirates are less confident about the next six months than they were six months ago (82.4) and a year ago (86.1). Despite the decrease in the Index score, consumers remain more optimistic than they were in the first half of 2009 (29.6).</p> <p>Consumer sentiment is becoming less positive about the next six months towards Quality of Life (77.0 vs. 87.5 six months ago), Regular Income (69.8 vs. 86.8), Economy (76.0 vs. 83.0) and Employment (71.9 vs. 82.4).&nbsp; Regarding the Stock Market, consumers in United Arab Emirates are more confident about the next six months compared to six months ago (73.0 vs. 72.6).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b><u>AFRICAN MARKETS</u></b></p> <p><b>KENYA (87.3)</b><br> Kenyans are more confident about the next six months compared to six months ago (73.5), and a year ago (47.9) recording the highest score of the country since it is included in the survey.</p> <p>Consumer perception for the next six months about the Quality of Life (85.7 vs. 67.0 six months ago), Stock Market (89.5 vs. 73.9), Economy (89.3 vs. 72.6) and Employment (83.7 vs. 65.6) are significantly more positive than six months ago. The Index score for Regular Income for the next six months remains the same as six months ago at 88.5.</p> <p><b>MOROCCO (65.3)</b><br> Moroccans are notably less optimistic about the next six months compared to six months ago (78.2).</p> <p>Consumers in Morocco hold a less positive outlook for the next six months about Quality of Life (64.4 vs. 72.9 six months ago), Stock Market (55.0 vs. 71.9), Regular Income (81.3 vs. 90.9), Economy (64.8 vs. 78.3) and Employment (61.3 vs. 77.2) than six months ago.</p> <p><b>NIGERIA (94.3)</b><br> Consumer confidence in Nigeria posts a steady increase from 83.2 six months ago, and 89.4 a year ago.</p> <p>Consumer sentiment about the five economic indicators six months ahead have become more positive than six months ago – Quality of Life (99.2 vs. 85.0), Stock Market (80.8 vs. 74.4), Regular Income (98.4 vs. 95.6), Economy (97.3 vs. 79.4) and Employment (95.7 vs. 81.7).</p> <p><b>SOUTH AFRICA (54.7)</b><br> South Africans are more pessimistic in their outlook for the next six months compared to six months ago (58.6) and one year ago (59.8).</p> <p>Four out five economic indicators have reflected a less positive perception of the consumers for the next six months than six months ago – Quality of Life (54.7 vs. 55.8 six months ago), Stock Market (49.4 vs. 55.2), Economy (51.8 vs. 60.4) and Employment (48.6 vs. 53.2). Consumer sentiment about the Regular Income six months ahead is slightly more positive than six months ago (69.2 vs. 68.3).</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2010/consumers-across-asia-pacific-continue-to-remain-cautiously-opti2010-11-30T16:00:00.000Z2010-11-30T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Significantly Down in 2011 Julia RoganNatural Disasters and Wider Economic Trends Impact Consumer Perceptions <p><b><i>Sydney, 4 July 2011 </i></b>– The <i>MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence </i>which depicts consumer confidence in Australia reveals overall optimism has fallen considerably since March 2010, from 74.1 points to 63.1 points in March 2011.</p> <p>The <i>MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence </i>is conducted annually, with the latest research undertaken in March and April, prior to the release of the Australian Economy performance statistics for the first three months of the year.&nbsp; <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>MasterCard Australia Country Manager, Andrew Cartwright said: “As the March ABS retail statistics indicate<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup>, households are keeping their wallets closed and are adopting a ‘wait and see’ approach, in particular keeping a close eye on RBA rate announcements, before making large scale purchases. This behaviour is mirrored through the slight softening of the growth of credit cards purchases, yet continued double digit growth in debit card usage where consumers are using their own funds.<sup>[<a href="#2">2</a>]</sup>”</p> <p>Australians are more pessimistic across two of the key metrics of consumer confidence – with notable drops from 66.7 points to 61.8 points for confidence in the economy, and 70.7 to 65.9 points for confidence in employment in the last six months.</p> <p>The research also demonstrates that opinion over the fate of the economy is divided. Whilst one in five (19%) consumers were ahead of the market in stating that Australia’s economic performance would slow down in the first six months of 2011, half (50%) thought it would remain the same and a third (31%) thought it would improve.</p> <p>Andrew Cartwright added: “Australian consumers are clearly concerned about how changes in economic trends and the subsequent impact the growth and contraction of the market will have on their pockets. It is no surprise that recent disasters including the Queensland floods and Cyclone Yasi have had an impact on consumer confidence. Australians have simply tailored their spending and saving accordingly.”</p> <p>Generational and gender differences also impact consumer optimism scores. Respondents aged 30 and under have an average Index score of 73.1 compared to a far lower Index score of 51.8 for the older generations. The difference between men and women is also notable – with an average Index score of 67.3 for men compared with 58.3 for women.</p> <p>“Australians moving into their retirement years are understandably concerned with their financial future and the impact interest rate shifts will have on their nest eggs, which means they are more cautious with their money,” said Mr Cartwright.</p> <p>Now in its 19<sup>th</sup> year, the <i>MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence</i> is Australia’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The latest survey was conducted from March to April 2011 and involved 647 consumers within the Australian market.</p> <p>The Index is based on a survey that measures consumer confidence on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>For the full report go to: <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/"><b>www.masterintelligence.com</b></a></p> <p><i><a name="1"></a>[1] March key figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, <a href="http://abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/E69B37031D9359FFCA2578A200147AD4?opendocument" target="_blank"><b>http://abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/E69B37031D9359FFCA2578A200147AD4?opendocument</b></a></i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><i><a name="2"></a>[2] March key figures from the monthly Reserve Bank Bulletin&nbsp;<b><a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/index.html#money_credit" target="_blank">http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/index.html#money_cred</a></b><a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/index.html#money_credit" target="_blank"><b>it</b></a></i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> MasterCard Research <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/consumer-confidence-significantl-down-in-20112011-07-03T16:00:00.000Z2011-07-03T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence in India at the Highest Level since 2008: MasterCard Index Manibalan ManoharanChennai and Bangalore Continue to Display High Levels Of Consumer Optimism in India<p><b><i>Mumbai, September 13 2011 </i></b>– Consumer confidence in India has risen to the highest level since H2 2008 according to the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence. However, consumers across Asia/Pacific displayed concern at the slow pace of the global economic recovery with a dip in optimism recorded over the last six months.</p> <p>As the global economy continues its slow recovery, 11 out of the 14 Asia/Pacific markets<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup> polled for the Index recorded positive consumer sentiment with stable optimism recorded in emerging and established markets including China (78.3), Singapore (77.9), Vietnam (77.1), India (75.2), Hong Kong (69.9), Taiwan (67.6), Malaysia (64.9) and Australia (63.1).</p> <p>However, 10 out of the 14 Asia/Pacific markets experienced an overall decline in consumer confidence when compared to the previous six months, with three markets - Thailand (46.1), New Zealand (42.2) and Japan (15.9) - showing widespread pessimism across the five key indicators. Overall Asia/ Pacific recorded a drop in consumer confidence from 68.0 to 61.5.</p> <p>Consumers in India are slightly more optimistic than they were six months ago (73.0) and a year ago (68.2). Indian consumers are optimistic across most of the key indicators with Quality of Life up from 71.3 six months ago to 77.4, Regular Income up from 75.4 to 82.0, the Economy up from 72.2 to 73.3 and Employment up from 70.8 to 72.7. However, they displayed less optimism about the Stock Market indicator than six months ago (75.1 vs. 70.8).</p> <p>Amongst the Indian cities, Chennai and Bangalore continue to display highest levels of consumer optimism with scores of 87.4 and 82.9 respectively. However, there is a minor dip in the levels of optimism as compared to previous round (90.7 and 85.6 respectively). Consumers in Mumbai have maintained healthy optimism with an improvement in index scores (82.8 vs. 76.6). Consumers in Delhi are less pessimistic about the upcoming six months with a score of 46.1 vs 38.0 six months ago.</p> <p>Now in its 19<sup>th</sup> year, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>The latest survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011 and involved 10,374 consumers from 14 markets. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>“Consumers across India are confident on most of the critical parameters of the MasterCard Index. However, they are becoming more cautious about the stock market, which is consistent with global trends,” says T.V. Seshadri, general manager and country president, India, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>“The optimism seen in key indicators such as the Economy, Employment and Quality of Life shows that consumers are still generally confident in the Indian growth story,” he added.</p> <p><i><a name="1"></a>[1] Asia/Pacific: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam&nbsp;</i></p> <p></p> MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence –2H 2011 - India<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="638"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>Cities</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>MWICC 2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Employment</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Economy</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Regular Income</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Stock Market</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Quality of Life</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Chennai</td> <td>87.4</td> <td>85.1</td> <td>84.0</td> <td>89.7</td> <td>87.7</td> <td>90.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Bangalore</td> <td>82.9</td> <td>90.0</td> <td>88.0</td> <td>92.1</td> <td>57.4</td> <td>86.9</td> </tr><tr><td>Mumbai</td> <td>82.8</td> <td>80.3</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>82.9</td> <td>81.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Delhi</td> <td>46.1</td> <td>35.3</td> <td>38.2</td> <td>58.1</td> <td>56.1</td> <td>43.0</td> </tr></tbody></table> MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence –APMEA <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="577"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Australia</td> <td>63.1</td> <td>63.0</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>69.5</td> <td>24.1</td> </tr><tr><td>China</td> <td>78.3</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>83.0</td> <td>85.3</td> <td>60.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Hong Kong</td> <td>69.9</td> <td>74.7</td> <td>76.6</td> <td>60.0</td> <td>24.7</td> </tr><tr><td>India</td> <td>75.2</td> <td>73.0</td> <td>68.2</td> <td>68.8</td> <td>68.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Indonesia</td> <td>58.0</td> <td>56.1</td> <td>61.4</td> <td>67.0</td> <td>49.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Japan</td> <td>15.9</td> <td>20.2</td> <td>27.8</td> <td>24.4</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>South Korea</td> <td>51.8</td> <td>55.7</td> <td>54.1</td> <td>59.8</td> <td>28.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Malaysia</td> <td>64.9</td> <td>66.2</td> <td>67.9</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>27.8</td> </tr><tr><td>New Zealand</td> <td>42.2</td> <td>53.3</td> <td>65.9</td> <td>69.7</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Philippines</td> <td>53.6</td> <td>80.1</td> <td>59.3</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>40.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Singapore</td> <td>77.9</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>86.6</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>31.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Taiwan</td> <td>67.6</td> <td>62.5</td> <td>65.7</td> <td>56.5</td> <td>39.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Thailand</td> <td>46.1</td> <td>57.3</td> <td>50.6</td> <td>55.3</td> <td>23.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Vietnam</td> <td>77.1</td> <td>90.3</td> <td>93.7</td> <td>90.0</td> <td>60.9</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Asia/Pacific</td> <td>61.5</td> <td>68.0</td> <td>69.1</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>38.7</td> </tr></tbody></table> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has an 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region. In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and is now conducted annually. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011. A total of 17,620 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/consumer-confidence-in-india-at-the-highest-level-since-20082011-09-12T16:00:00.000Z2011-09-12T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Wanes in Hong Kong: MasterCard Survey Catherine Yuen, Gloria Lai Local consumers less optimistic in Economy, Employment, and Regular Income; with a gloomy outlook towards Quality of Life<p><b><i>Hong Kong, July 19 2011 </i></b>– Consumer confidence in Hong Kong has dipped over the last six months, according to the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, released today. Though consumers remain cautiously optimistic with an overall Index score of 69.9, the latest Index score for Hong Kong is lower than previous surveys conducted six months (74.7) and a year ago (76.6) respectively.</p> <p>Hong Kong respondents feel less optimistic in their expectations of the Economy (69.4 vs. 77.9 six months ago), Employment (71.5 vs. 80.4) and Regular Income (81.4 vs. 83.2). Their confidence in Quality of Life even fell from a positive 57.7 in the previous six months to a pessimistic 49.9.&nbsp; However, they seem more confident in the Stock Market as it is the only indicator that increased slightly (77.6 vs. 74.1).</p> <p>Amongst the Hong Kong respondents, those under the age of 30 are more optimistic than their older counterparts (71.2 for those below 30 vs. 68.9 for those above 30). These results mark a dramatic reversal compared to six months ago when the consumer sentiment of those aged 30 and above was more positive than those who were younger (75.9 vs. 71.4).</p> <p>Now in its 19<sup>th</sup> year, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>The latest survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011 and involved 10,374 consumers from 14 markets. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>“Though Hong Kong records a decline in optimism, consumer attitudes remain positive. There is clearly a perception that the recovery from the financial crisis is not going as smoothly as people would like,” said Jeroen van Son, Head of Hong Kong and Macau, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>“Local consumers are still wary in their outlook for the months ahead due to the uncertainties caused by issues such as rising commodity and property prices, natural disasters and political instability in other markets and ongoing financial uncertainty across the Eurozone. Nevertheless, it is encouraging to see that consumer perceptions across most of the indicators continue to be optimistic.”</p> <p>In Asia/Pacific, consumers are concerned at the slow pace of the global economic recovery with a dip in optimism recorded over the last six months (61.5 vs. 68.0). Ten out of the 14 Asia/Pacific markets, such as China, Hong Kong and Singapore, recorded an overall decline in consumer confidence. Japan and New Zealand, both still recovering from devastating earthquakes this year, were the least confident nations. Taiwan is one of only four markets that saw consumer sentiment moved upwards. &nbsp;</p> <table width="571" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Australia</td> <td>63.1</td> <td>63.0</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>69.5</td> <td>24.1</td> </tr><tr><td>China</td> <td>78.3</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>83.0</td> <td>85.3</td> <td>60.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Hong Kong</td> <td>69.9</td> <td>74.7</td> <td>76.6</td> <td>60.0</td> <td>24.7</td> </tr><tr><td>India</td> <td>75.2</td> <td>73.0</td> <td>68.2</td> <td>68.8</td> <td>68.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Indonesia</td> <td>58.0</td> <td>56.1</td> <td>61.4</td> <td>67.0</td> <td>49.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Japan</td> <td>15.9</td> <td>20.2</td> <td>27.8</td> <td>24.4</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>South Korea</td> <td>51.8</td> <td>55.7</td> <td>54.1</td> <td>59.8</td> <td>28.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Malaysia</td> <td>64.9</td> <td>66.2</td> <td>67.9</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>27.8</td> </tr><tr><td>New Zealand</td> <td>42.2</td> <td>53.3</td> <td>65.9</td> <td>69.7</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Philippines</td> <td>53.6</td> <td>80.1</td> <td>59.3</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>40.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Singapore</td> <td>77.9</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>86.6</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>31.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Taiwan</td> <td>67.6</td> <td>62.5</td> <td>65.7</td> <td>56.5</td> <td>39.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Thailand</td> <td>46.1</td> <td>57.3</td> <td>50.6</td> <td>55.3</td> <td>23.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Vietnam</td> <td>77.1</td> <td>90.3</td> <td>93.7</td> <td>90.0&nbsp;<br> </td> <td>60.9</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Asia/Pacific</td> <td>61.5</td> <td>68.0</td> <td>69.1</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>38.7</td> </tr></tbody></table> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011. A total of 17,620 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p><b>&nbsp;</b></p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/consumer-confidence-wanes-in-hongkong2011-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2011-07-18T16:00:00.000ZNigerian Consumer Confidence Remains Highly Optimistic – MasterCard Index Aderayo BankoleNigeria ranks as most optimistic market surveyed in Africa<p>Lagos, 18 August 2011 – Results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey for the first half of 2011 have revealed that Nigerian consumer confidence remains highly optimistic.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index recorded a notable 12.7% year-on-year increase from a score of 83.2 a year ago, to a very positive current score of 93.8.</p> <p>Now in its third year in Nigeria, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock market, Regular income and Quality of life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>The latest survey was conducted from the 15<sup>th</sup> March to 27<sup>th</sup> April 2011 and involved 17,620 consumers from 24 markets across the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa regions <sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup>. Data collection was via Internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>“The notable increase of nearly 13% compared to the 83.2 that the market scored a year ago clearly indicates that Nigerians are approaching the next six months with a strong sense of optimism,” says Daniel Monehin, Area Head, East &amp; West Africa and Indian Ocean Islands, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>“Nigeria is predicted to overtake South Africa as the largest economy on the continent by as soon as 2023,”says Dr. Roelof Botha, independent economic analyst. “This forecast has been widely publicised in Nigeria, and along with several other noteworthy developments in the market, has undoubtedly contributed to a new sense of national pride as Nigerians anticipate their status as a regional and global economic force in the years to come. The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is clearly reflecting this, as are other studies conducted by the World Bank, Morgan Stanley and the Africa Business Panel.”</p> <p>Compared to Nigeria’s Index results six months ago, two of the five indicators - Regular Income and Employment - increased marginally by 0.6 points each, while consumer sentiment on the Economy remained unchanged. However, these gains were offset by the Quality of Life and Stock Market indicators that both declined by 1.7 points.</p> <p>Regular income at 99.0 points was the most optimistic of the five indicators for Nigerians, followed by Quality of Life with a score of 97.5.</p> <p>When asked whether they were expecting their regular income to either increase, remain the same or decrease over the next six months, nearly 93% of Nigerian respondents said that they were expecting it to increase, 7% said they were expecting it to remain the same and only 1% said that they were expecting it to decrease.”</p> <p>These responses are based on two strong contributing factors, Botha points out. “The Nigerian government recently legislated that the market’s minimum wage should increase by 140%. While there were initially some concerns at the inflationary impact of this increase, Nigeria’s consumer price index (CPI) has been lowered over the last two years, while food price inflation has been curbed by a rise in agricultural output.”</p> <p>Furthermore, substantial investment from several multinational companies has boosted employment prospects, with several more companies seeking to introduce or expand their production facilities in Nigeria in the coming months.</p> <p>“The government has also reduced the tax burden placed on Nigerians, with the ratio of taxes having dropped from 38% in 2005 to an estimated 26% at the time of the survey,” he adds.</p> <p>Botha said that while the slight decline in the Quality of Life indicator should not be ignored with respect to the identification of consumer confidence trends over time, it was less than a 2% decline compared to the previous Index which indicates that consumers remain firmly positive about their general quality of life in Nigeria.</p> <p>Consumer sentiment on the Economy and Employment indicators remained exceptionally positive with scores of 97.3 and 96.3 respectively.</p> <p>“Inflation is close to single digits, after hovering close to the 20% level in 2005 and the market’s currency has been relatively stable, which has in turn prevented an escalation in the price of imported goods,” says Botha. “The Nigerian government has implemented and maintained prudent macroeconomic policies over the last four years, strengthened financial institutions and made progress in addressing the market’s infrastructure deficiencies. Along with a surge in the oil price and an increase in production, these elements continue to give Nigerians a high level of future confidence.”</p> <p>The Stock Market indicator, while still in optimistic territory with a score of 79.1, was the least positive of the five indicators and showed a decline of 1.7 points compared to the previous Index.</p> <p>When asked whether they thought the local stock market index would go up, remain the same, or go down over the next six months, nearly 65% of Nigerian respondents said that they were expecting it to go up, however 35% expected it to either remain the same or go down.</p> <p>Although still in very optimistic territory, the Nigerian consumer confidence level is off its historical high of 94.3 points recorded in the second half of 2010. However, it remains above Nigeria’s historical average of 90.2 since the survey was first conducted in the second half of 2009.</p> <p>“Nigeria’s economy is significantly more diversified, with retail trade becoming more vibrant and financial markets deepening,” says Botha. “This diversification has been fuelled by increased urbanisation, a growing population, access to technology, and a sustained rise in real per capita income levels. Increased spending on education (from 0.2% of the CPI basket to 4%) is particularly encouraging, as a market’s development path is traditionally closely correlated with the level of education and vocational attainment.”</p> <p>An interesting contributor to sentiment in the market is the success of the Niger Delta Amnesty programme, through which tens of thousands of armed agitators have surrendered their weapons in return for rehabilitation and reintegration into Nigerian society. Apart from returning dissidents to the economic landscape, this initiative has reduced violence in the oil-rich region, leading analysts to be confident that oil production will more than double to 2.3 million barrels a day by 2012.</p> <p>From an African perspective, amongst the four additional African markets included in the survey – South Africa, Kenya, Egypt and Morocco – Nigeria was the most optimistic market, 5.8 points higher than the next most optimistic market – Morocco.</p> <p>“It’s very encouraging to see that Nigerian consumer confidence continues to be strong, steady and positive, and currently higher than Nigeria’s historical average since the survey was first conducted in 2009, ” concludes Monehin</p> <p><b><i><a name="1"></a>[1]</i></b><b><i>Asia/Pacific</i></b><i>: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. <b>Middle East</b>: Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates. <b>Africa</b>: Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa</i></p> <p><img width="571" height="356" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/nigeria.jpg"></p> <p><img width="574" height="357" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/morocco.jpg"><img width="576" height="359" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/egypt.jpg"><img width="574" height="358" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/kenya.jpg"></p> <p><img width="520" height="388" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/south%20africa.jpg1.jpg"></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><b></b></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty-four markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 13 September to 11 November 2010. A total of 10,502 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 24 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite of research products in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the flagship MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, and the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Purchasing Resilience, both of which are released six monthly, and the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement and the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Online Shopping, which are released annually. In addition to the Index properties, MasterCard’s suite of research properties includes the MasterCard Worldwide Survey on Consumer Purchasing Priorities, released six monthly, and the MasterCard Worldwide Survey on Ethical Spending Behavior, released annually.</p> <p>Besides these, MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports; the series represents in part its ongoing research and analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 70 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by its Asia/Pacific economist, Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p>The MasterCard Indexes and Insights reports are available at <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/"><b>www.masterintelligence.com</b></a></p> <p></p> About MasterCard Worldwide <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/nigerian-consumer-confidence-remains-highly-optimistic2011-08-17T16:00:00.000Z2011-08-17T16:00:00.000ZPositive Consumer Confidence Maintained in Malaysia: New MasterCard Index Kashini Krishnamurthy, Nabila AdnanPositive Consumer Confidence Maintained in Malaysia: New MasterCard Index<p><b><i>Kuala Lumpur, 1 August 2011 </i></b>– Consumers across Asia/Pacific are concerned at the slow pace of the global economic recovery with a dip in optimism recorded over the last six months, according to the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence.</p> <p>As the global economy continues its slow recovery, 11 out of the 14 Asia/Pacific markets<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup> polled for the Index recorded positive consumer sentiment with stable optimism recorded in emerging and established markets including China (78.3), Singapore (77.9), Vietnam (77.1), India (75.2), Hong Kong (69.9), Taiwan (67.6), Malaysia (64.9) and Australia (63.1).</p> <p>In Malaysia, the index score was a positive 64.9, a slight drop from 66.2 six months ago. Consumer sentiments towards Regular Income (70.4 vs. 62.9) have improved from six months ago, but consumers are less optimistic about Employment (64.6 vs. 65.9), the Economy (64.9 vs 66.2), Quality of Life (65.9 vs. 70.0) and the Stock Market (58.4 vs. 66.2).</p> <p>However, 10 out of the 14 Asia/Pacific markets experienced an overall decline in consumer confidence when compared to the previous six months, with three markets - Thailand (46.1), New Zealand (42.2) and Japan (15.9) - showing widespread pessimism across the five key indicators. Overall Asia/ Pacific recorded a drop in consumer confidence from 68.0 to 61.5.</p> <p>Now in its 19<sup>th</sup> year, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>The latest survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011 and involved 10,374 consumers from 14 markets. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i><i><a name="1"></a>[1] Asia/Pacific: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam&nbsp;</i></p> <p></p> Asia/Pacific rocked by Japan, NZ earthquakes<p>Overall confidence in the Economy in the Asia/Pacific region fell from 70.6 to 59.1, with Employment down from 67.5 to 59.9. Confidence also fell among consumers on the key indicator of Quality of Life (from 64.7 to 57.0) and the Stock Market (from 65.8 to 58.1), but increased slightly on Regular Income (from 71.6 to 73.1).</p> <p>Japan and New Zealand, both still recovering from devastating earthquakes this year, experienced declines in consumer confidence across most key indicators, with New Zealand’s overall confidence falling from a positive 53.3 in the previous six months to a pessimistic 42.2, with a strong decline in confidence in the Economy (from 53.1 to 35.1). Japan’s overall consumer confidence was at its lowest since 2002, with confidence in the Economy falling from 20.6 six months ago to 12.3 and confidence in Employment down from 21.8 to 13.3.</p> <p>Steep falls in consumer confidence were found in the Philippines, where optimism fell from 80.1 to 53.6 over the last six months, and across all key indicators, most dramatically in Employment (80.0 to 45.3), Qualify of Life (80.5 to 46.7) and the Economy (83.6 to 54.0).</p> <p>“While consumer attitudes remain overwhelmingly positive across this Index there is clearly a perception that the recovery from the financial crisis is not going as smoothly as people would like,” said Yuwa Hedrick-Wong, global economic advisor for MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>“Consumers are fantastic barometers of economic performance. As parts of the world have endured six very difficult months dealing with natural disasters, political instability and with ongoing financial uncertainty across the Eurozone, it is no surprise to see consumer sentiment declining across some of these markets.” &nbsp;</p> <table width="571" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Australia</td> <td>63.1</td> <td>63.0</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>69.5</td> <td>24.1</td> </tr><tr><td>China</td> <td>78.3</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>83.0</td> <td>85.3</td> <td>60.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Hong Kong</td> <td>69.9</td> <td>74.7</td> <td>76.6</td> <td>60.0</td> <td>24.7</td> </tr><tr><td>India</td> <td>75.2</td> <td>73.0</td> <td>68.2</td> <td>68.8</td> <td>68.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Indonesia</td> <td>58.0</td> <td>56.1</td> <td>61.4</td> <td>67.0</td> <td>49.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Japan</td> <td>15.9</td> <td>20.2</td> <td>27.8</td> <td>24.4</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>South Korea</td> <td>51.8</td> <td>55.7</td> <td>54.1</td> <td>59.8</td> <td>28.8</td> </tr><tr><td>Malaysia</td> <td>64.9</td> <td>66.2</td> <td>67.9</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>27.8</td> </tr><tr><td>New Zealand</td> <td>42.2</td> <td>53.3</td> <td>65.9</td> <td>69.7</td> <td>21.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Philippines</td> <td>53.6</td> <td>80.1</td> <td>59.3</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>40.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Singapore</td> <td>77.9</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>86.6</td> <td>79.4</td> <td>31.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Taiwan</td> <td>67.6</td> <td>62.5</td> <td>65.7</td> <td>56.5</td> <td>39.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Thailand</td> <td>46.1</td> <td>57.3</td> <td>50.6</td> <td>55.3</td> <td>23.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Vietnam</td> <td>77.1</td> <td>90.3</td> <td>93.7</td> <td>90.0&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> </td> <td>60.9</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Asia/Pacific</td> <td>61.5</td> <td>68.0</td> <td>69.1</td> <td>66.3</td> <td>38.7</td> </tr></tbody></table> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has an 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011. A total of 17,620 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/positive-consumer-confidence-maintained-in-malaysia2011-07-31T16:00:00.000Z2011-07-31T16:00:00.000ZSignificant Rise in South African Consumer Confidence – MasterCard Index Nicky James, Birgit Deibele Consumer confidence rebounds to highest level since 2009<p><b><i>Johannesburg, 28<sup>th</sup> July 2011</i></b> – South African consumer confidence has rebounded from historic lows to its highest level since 2009 according to the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, released today.</p> <p>The survey recorded an overall increase of 10.8 points in South African consumer confidence from a low of 54.7 only six months ago to a current optimistic score of 65.5.</p> <p>Now in its seventh year in South Africa, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa (APMEA) region’s most comprehensive consumer confidence survey. Released twice a year, the Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock market, Regular income and Quality of life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>The latest survey was conducted from the 15<sup>th</sup> March to 27<sup>th</sup> April 2011 and involved 17,620 consumers from 24 markets <sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup> across the APMEA region. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>“South Africa’s optimistic score of 65.5 is a jump of nearly 20% compared to the 54.7 that the market scored in the previous six months, with all five of the key indicators that make up the overall consumer confidence score seeing increases. This indicates that South Africans are feeling strongly positive about the next six months,” says Anna Jones, Area Head for MasterCard Worldwide: Southern Africa.</p> <p>“The increase in the overall MasterCard Confidence Index score to its highest level since 2009 is not surprising when viewed against the fact that South Africa emerged from the global recession as early as the third quarter of 2009. During the first quarter of 2011, South Africa recorded its seventh successive quarter of positive real GDP growth, rising to an impressive 4.8%. Furthermore, real disposable income levels of households have increased to an all-time high during early 2011 - close to R33,000 in annual <i>per capita</i> terms” says independent economic advisor, Dr. Roelof Botha.</p> <p>The most significant increase in optimism compared to the previous Index came from the Employment indicator which saw a jump of 15.2 points from a score of 48.6 six months ago to a current score of 63.8.</p> <p>“The accuracy of the survey results for Employment is supported by data from Statistics South Africa that confirms a return to formal sector employment creation since the fourth quarter of 2010,” he added.</p> <p>Other indicators that saw noteworthy increases were the Economy, Quality of Life and Stock Market with increases of 11.4, 11.2 and 10.2 points respectively.</p> <p>Although it had the smallest increase of the five indicators in comparison to the previous Index, Regular Income still saw a notable increase from an already moderately optimistic score of 69.2 six months ago to a current score of 75.3. Regular income was the most optimistic of the five indicators for South Africans, 9.4 points higher than the next most optimistic indicator - Quality of Life - that had a score of 65.9.</p> <p>When asked whether they are expecting their regular income to either increase, remain the same or decrease over the next six months, nearly 45% of South African respondents said that they were expecting it to increase, 40% said they were expecting it to remain the same and only 15% said that they expected it to decrease.</p> <p>“The rise of over six points in consumers’ already-high confidence in Regular Income is correlated to consistent increases in average remuneration levels since the end of the recession. According to Statistics South Africa, the average nominal salary in the formal sectors of the economy was more than 27% higher in the first quarter of 2011 than two years earlier. Salary increases have also outstripped inflation by a margin of close to 9% over the past two years. ” says Botha.</p> <p>Although in a very optimistic space, the South African consumer confidence level is still off its historical peak of 91.1 points from the second half of 2006, and is below South Africa’s historical average of 73.2 since the survey was first conducted in the first half of 2004.</p> <p>In summary, the strong improvement in the overall MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence in South Africa can be viewed against the backdrop of sound increases in the levels of household consumption expenditure as well as increases in disposable incomes.</p> <p>“During the first quarter of this year, household consumption expenditure on durable goods was more than 22% higher than a year earlier, signalling a renewed appetite amongst consumers for credit-related spending. Fortunately, the purchasing power of South African households reached a new record high this year and it is clear from the MasterCard Survey that consumer sentiment is following suit,” Botha concludes.</p> <p>“It is encouraging to see that not only has consumer confidence rebounded to its highest level since 2009, but that increases were recorded across all five indicators. This has resulted in South African consumer confidence outperforming all of the non-oil producing markets in the APMEA region,” concludes Jones.</p> <p><i><a name="1"></a>[1]</i><i> <b>Africa</b>: Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa. <b>Middle East</b>: Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates. <b>Asia/Pacific:</b> Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><i></i></p> <p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/south%20africa.jpg1.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="429" height="321" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/south%20africa.jpg1.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty-four markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 13 September to 11 November 2010. A total of 10,502 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 24 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties Asia/Pacific, Middle East & Africa<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/significant-rise-in-south-african-consumer-confidence2011-07-27T16:00:00.000Z2011-07-27T16:00:00.000ZThe Arab Spring Effect – Consumer Confidence Soars in Parts of Middle East and North Africa May Ng, Nadia EjazSix Out of Eight MENA Markets Show Dramatic Increase in Optimism<p><b>13 September 2011: </b>Despite the ongoing recession and political instability which has rocked the Arab world, consumers in the Middle East and North Africa are more optimistic now about the future than ever before, according to the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence.</p> <p>The survey, conducted between 15 March and 27 April this year with 17,620 consumers from 25 markets, recorded an 11.8 point rise in consumer confidence from the previous six month period, bringing the Middle East index to 83.4<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup>, significantly higher than consumers in Africa (73.8) and Asia Pacific (61.5). This figure is the highest recorded since the first half of 2007 when the Middle East index recorded a score of 83.6.</p> <p>With a cheerful index of 99, first time participant Oman recorded the highest score amongst the 25 countries involved in the survey, followed by oil rich Saudi Arabia (98.6) and Qatar (95.7), the world’s largest exporter of liquefied natural gas in the world. Nigeria (93.8) proved to be the most optimistic nation in Africa, whilst economic powerhouse China (78.3) was the high scorer for Asia Pacific, followed closely by Singapore (77.9).</p> <p>Now in its 19<sup>th</sup> year overall and 8<sup>th</sup> year in the Middle East and Africa, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>This latest survey involved data collection via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><i><a name="1"></a>[1] Middle East average does not include Morocco, which is counted as part of African region</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> Political change breeds hope for a brighter future<p>Surprisingly, the wave of change which has swept through the Middle East and North Africa since January this year has resulted in a dramatic increase in economic optimism amongst residents of the Arab world. Middle Eastern markets<sup>[<a href="#2">1</a>]</sup> polled for the index showed a marked improvement in consumer sentiment with increases in the key indicators of quality of life (70.7 to 81.9), stock market (63.2 to 81.5), regular income (83.0 to 86.8), economy (69.7 to 83.0) and employment (71.4 to 83.5).</p> <p>Post-revolutionary Egypt showed the most dramatic change, moving from an overall index of 47.7 to 78.2. The study recorded significant increases in Egyptian’s expectations of quality of life (from 38.7 to 76.8), stock market performance (from 37.2 to 75.4), economic outlook (from 39.7 to 76.5) and employment prospects (from 38.9 to 76.5).</p> <p>Morocco, which was grouped as part of the African region, also boasted a spike in results across all key indicators, bringing the overall consumer confidence figure to 88.5, up from 65.3 in the second half of 2010.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><i><a name="2"></a>[1] Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, KSA, Oman, UAE and Qatar</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> Evidence of economic recovery<p>The second largest increase in optimism in the MENA region came from the UAE, one the markets hardest hit by the economic downturn. After a deep slump in consumer confidence in the first half of 2009 (29.6), the UAE experienced a resurgence in hope in the later part of 2009 which again declined in the second half of 2010 (73.6). This latest study shows once more a striking resurgence in consumer confidence, reaching 95.6, the highest on record since 2004.</p> <p>This phenomenon perhaps mirrors the positive economic effect of the rising price of oil and the increase in household disposable income brought about by the falling cost of rental.&nbsp;</p> <p>Kuwait, Qatar and KSA also experienced an increase in consumer optimism, albeit to a lesser extent. Qatar recorded a consumer confidence index of 95.7, another record high for an Arab nation.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>Market</b><b></b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H1 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H12010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H1 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2 2008</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>78.2</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.3</td> <td>55.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>90.8</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.5</td> <td>96.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>15.0</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.4</td> <td>69.1</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>99.0</td> <td>*</td> <td><br type="_moz"> </td> <td><br type="_moz"> </td> <td><br type="_moz"> </td> <td><br type="_moz"> </td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>95.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.4</td> <td>76.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>98.6</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.1</td> <td>72.4</td> </tr><tr><td>UAE</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> <td>75.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Morocco[1]</td> <td>88.5</td> <td>65.3</td> <td>78.2</td> <td>66.1</td> <td>N/A</td> <td>N/A</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>83.4</td> <td>71.6</td> <td>69.2</td> <td>74.5</td> <td>49.9</td> <td>72.7</td> </tr></tbody></table> <p>*Survey series started in H1 2011</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><i>[1] Not included in Middle East region summary</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011. A total of 17,620 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/the-arab-spring-effect-consumer-confidence-soars-in-parts-of-middle-east-and-north-africa2011-09-12T16:00:00.000Z2011-09-12T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence in Kuwait Highly Optimistic: MasterCard Survey Heba Hassan, Nadia EjazMasterCard Survey Shows Consumer Confidence in Middle East is Highest since 2008<p><b><i>Kuwait City, Kuwait, 13 September 2011-</i></b> Consumers in Kuwait have indicated that they are highly optimistic about the coming 6 months, according to the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence. With a score of 90.8, consumer confidence in Kuwait shows significant improvement from 6 months ago (80.4) and even 18 months (70.9) ago. In fact, the latest consumer confidence score for Kuwait is considerably higher than markets such as China (78.3), Hong Kong (69.9) and India (75.2).</p> <p>Now in its 19<sup>th</sup> year, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>The latest survey was conducted from March to April 2011 and involved 17,620 consumers from 25<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup> markets. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>Consumers in Kuwait are most optimistic about Employment (96.2) and the Economy (93.6), and least optimistic about the Stock Market (83.4). However, all indicators of consumer confidence were rated as being very positive, including Regular Income (91.3) and Quality of Life (89.7).</p> <p>The survey also revealed that female consumers in Kuwait tend to be more optimistic about their prospects for the coming months as compared to male consumers, and that those under the age of 30 tend to be more positive than consumers over the age of thirty. However, it is worth noting that confidence levels for all gender and age demographics remain well above 85.</p> <p>“It is very encouraging to see that consumer sentiment in Kuwait is gaining an upward momentum and is expected to remain high in the coming months. This is, no doubt, positive news for businesses across many sectors in Kuwait,” said Sumit Mittal, vice president, Kuwait, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>Overall, in the Middle East, consumer confidence has gone up significantly compared to six months ago (83.4 vs. 71.6). Respondents were most optimistic about Regular Income (86.8 vs. 83.0 six months ago) and least optimistic about the Stock Market, even though the latter indicator has increased drastically in the last six months (81.5 vs. 63.2). In fact, all five economic indicators have increased in the Middle East compared to six months ago. The Middle East’s aggregate score of 83.4 is also substantially higher than that of Asia/ Pacific (61.5) and Africa (73.8).</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><i><a name="1"></a>[1] Asia/Pacific: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam</i></p> <p><i>Middle East: Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates</i></p> <p><i>Africa: Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p>Amongst other findings in the Middle East:</p> <ul> <li>Consumer Confidence is highest in Oman with a remarkable score of 99.0. It is worth nothing that this is the first time Oman is being included in the survey, so there are no previous comparable scores.</li> <li>The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (the highest scoring market in the survey six months ago with a score of 95.1) further increased its score to 98.6.</li> <li>All markets surveyed across the Middle East reflected increased levels of Consumer Confidence with the exception of Lebanon, for which the score fell from 54.3 six months ago to 15.0 in the current survey.</li> </ul> <p><b><i>Consumer Confidence Results:</i></b></p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="586"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2008</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2008</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>78.2</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.3</td> <td>55.6</td> <td>32.3</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>90.8</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>89.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>15.0</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.4</td> <td>69.1</td> <td>32.0</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>99.0</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>95.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.4</td> <td>76.2</td> <td>88.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>98.6</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.1</td> <td>72.4</td> <td>80.2</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>85.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>83.4</td> <td>71.6</td> <td>69.2</td> <td>74.5</td> <td>49.9</td> <td>72.7</td> <td>66.4</td> </tr></tbody></table> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 19-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific.&nbsp;</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The last MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 15 March to 27 April 2011. A total of 17,620 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp; In each market except China and India, 400 or more people were surveyed.&nbsp; A minimum sample size of 800 was collected from China and India.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp;Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys, personal, telephone and Computer Aided Telephone interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level, except China and India where because of the larger sample, the margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2011/consumer-confidence-in-kuwait-highly-optimistic2011-09-12T16:00:00.000Z2011-09-12T16:00:00.000ZPessimistic Outlook for Hong Kong Consumers: MasterCard Index Gloria Lai , Matthew Liu Local consumers show surge in negative sentiment across five key indicators<p><b><i>Hong Kong, 29 March 2012</i></b><i> </i>– Consumer confidence in Hong Kong has dropped significantly over the last six months to the second-lowest level since the financial crisis in 2008, according to the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard Worldwide</b></a> Index<sup>™</sup> of Consumer Confidence, released today. The latest score for Hong Kong shows a sharp fall of 38.7 Index points, from 68.6 in the first half of 2011 to 29.9 Index points in the second half.</p> <p>Hong Kong has seen its consumer confidence deteriorate after two years of optimism, from a peak of 76.6 in the first half of 2010, to 74.7 in the second half of 2010, to the more cautiously optimistic Index of 68.6 in the first half of 2011. The last pessimistic result recorded from the survey was in the first half of 2009, with the Index measuring consumer confidence in Hong Kong at 24.7.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>™</sup> of Consumer Confidence (“Index”) is based on a survey conducted between 5 December 2011 and 8 February 2012 on 12,915 respondents aged 18 to 64 years in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. This is the 38<sup>th</sup> survey of consumer confidence conducted since 1993. Now in its 20th year the Index is Asia/Pacific’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard’s financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>Confidence among Hong Kong’s consumers showed extreme deterioration in their expectations across all five key economic indicators measured.&nbsp; Hong Kong respondents feel most pessimistic about the Economy (19.9 vs. 66.4 six months ago), followed by Employment (down from 70.4 to 25.7 Index points) and Quality of Life (down from 46.3 to 21.1 Index points). A steep fall was also recorded in consumers’ attitudes towards the Stock Market (down from 79.1 to 23.3 Index points). Regular Income was the&nbsp; only indicator that Hongkongers seem relatively neutral towards. It is the sole indicator that scored above 50, though it also recorded a drop from 80.6 to 59.4 Index points.</p> <p>Among the Hong Kong respondents, men (32.4) are more confident than women (27.4), and those under the age of 30 reflect a more positive outlook as their scores average higher than their older counterparts (31.4 for those below 30 vs. 26 for those above 30).</p> <p>Jeroen van Son, head of Hong Kong and Macau, MasterCard Worldwide, said “The persistent Euro-zone crisis has been a serious drag on global economic growth over the past six months, and Hong Kong is no exception. In addition, a variety of economic issues have led to a significant drop in confidence among local consumers in their outlook for the months ahead. This includes uncertainties caused by issues such as the fear of a hard landing in China as growth slows, rising inflation rates in the territory, unstable property prices and a changing political environment in Hong Kong. These factors have all contributed to a general negative outlook that is at odds with the more optimistic attitude seen in previous results.”</p> <p>In Asia/Pacific, consumer confidence among developed markets has dropped as concerns about slow growth spread across the region. Only 5 out of 14 Asia/Pacific<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup> markets polled recorded positive sentiment when compared to the first half of 2011. The last Index conducted during the first half of 2011 showed that 11 out of the 14 Asia/Pacific markets polled recorded positive consumer sentiment with stable optimism. Overall, Asia/Pacific saw a drop from 57.4 Index points in the first half of 2011 to 52.1 Index points with declines in all key indicators.</p> <p>China (down 13.7 Index points), Taiwan (down 36.3 Index points), Singapore (down 25.9 Index points) and South Korea (down 19.7 Index points) saw strong declines in consumer sentiment compared to the previous six months. However, significant improvement was recorded in emerging markets such as Indonesia (up 21.8 Index points), Thailand (up 19.5 Index points), India (up 18.4 Index points) and the Philippines (up 24.7 Index points).</p> <p><a name="1"></a>[1] <i>Asia/Pacific: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="407"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b><br type="_moz"> </b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2" valign="top"><b>H2 2011 Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2" valign="top"><b>Change from last Half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Asia Pacific</b></td> <td>52.1</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>-5.3</td> <td>Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Australia</b></td> <td>43.3</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-13.7</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>China</b></td> <td>64.8</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>-13.7</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Hong Kong</b></td> <td>29.9</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-38.7</td> <td>Extreme Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>India</b></td> <td>81.2</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>18.4</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Indonesia</b></td> <td>76.2</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>21.8</td> <td>Extreme Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Japan</b></td> <td>16.2</td> <td>Very Pessimistic</td> <td>-0.5</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>South Korea</b></td> <td>29.9</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-19.7</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Malaysia</b></td> <td>52.8</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>-7.8</td> <td>Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>New Zealand</b></td> <td>35.7</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-2.9</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Philippines</b></td> <td>77.0</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>24.7</td> <td>Extreme Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Singapore</b></td> <td>50.0</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>-25.9</td> <td>Extreme Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Taiwan</b></td> <td>30.1</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-36.3</td> <td>Extreme Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Thailand</b></td> <td>63.9</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>19.5</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Vietnam</b></td> <td>78.8</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>0.8</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr></tbody></table> Hong Kong’s Index of Consumer Confidence over the Past Five Years <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="410"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b><br type="_moz"> </b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H1<br> 2007</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2<br> 2007</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H1<br> 2008</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2<br> 2008</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H1<br> 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2<br> 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H1<br> 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2<br> 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H1<br> 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>H2<br> 2011</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Employment</b></td> <td>89.1</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>88.2</td> <td>41.7</td> <td>15.9</td> <td>67.4</td> <td>83.3</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>70.4</td> <td>25.7</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Economy</b></td> <td>91.1</td> <td>91.2</td> <td>88.9</td> <td>28.4</td> <td>22.8</td> <td>68.3</td> <td>83.8</td> <td>77.9</td> <td>66.4</td> <td>19.9</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Regular Income</b></td> <td>90.5</td> <td>92.3</td> <td>91.7</td> <td>66.4</td> <td>27.2</td> <td>53.2</td> <td>75.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>80.6</td> <td>59.4</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Stock Market</b></td> <td>70.6</td> <td>69.3</td> <td>71.2</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>37.7</td> <td>63.2</td> <td>79.2</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>79.1</td> <td>23.3</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Quality of Life</b></td> <td>82.3</td> <td>83.3</td> <td>75.5</td> <td>48.6</td> <td>19.8</td> <td>48.0</td> <td>61.7</td> <td>57.7</td> <td>46.3</td> <td>21.1</td> </tr><tr><td><b>MasterIndex</b></td> <td>84.7</td> <td>85.9</td> <td>83.1</td> <td>41.8</td> <td>24.7</td> <td>60.0</td> <td>76.6</td> <td>74.7</td> <td>68.6</td> <td>29.9</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> <p></p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 5 December 2011 to 8February 2012. A total of 12,915 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p></p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contacts<p>Gloria Lai<br> (852) 2533 9983<br> <a href="mailto:glai@webershandwick.com"><b>glai@webershandwick.com</b></a><br> <br> Matthew Liu<br> (852) 2533 9927<br> <a href="mailto:mliu@webershandwick.com"><b>mliu@webershandwick.com</b></a></p> The MasterCard Worldwide IndexTM of Consumer Confidence (“Index”) is based on a survey conducted between November 2012 and December 2012 on 11,339 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/pessimistic-outlook-for-hongkong-consumers2012-03-28T16:00:00.000Z2012-03-28T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Faces Further Decline Georgette Tan, Robert O’BrienUncertainty over Employment and Personal Income Outlook<p><b><i>Sydney, March 01, 2012 </i></b>– The <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> Worldwide Index<sup> TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence,<i> </i>which tracks forward looking sentiment of Australians over the next six months, has fallen sharply from 57 Index points in the first half of 2011 to 43.3 Index points.</p> <p>Conducted twice a year, the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence undertaken between December 2011 and February 2012, shows that retailers still face significant obstacles before consumer sentiment returns to positive territory.&nbsp; <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i>“Despite seeing a lift in overall retail growth in the months leading up to Christmas, it is no surprise that the latest <a href="http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/FB435B0F7C83FA1DCA2579B2000DBD69?opendocument" target="_blank"><b>figures</b></a> indicate a decline in the outlook for confidence given that consumers kept retail expenditure on a short leash during the festive month of December<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup>,” said MasterCard Australia Country Manager, Andrew Cartwright.</p> <p>“Consumers are still keeping a very close eye on their exposure to debt. This is evidenced by the annual growth rate on <a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c01hist.xls" target="_blank"><b>credit card balances</b></a><sup>[<a href="#2">2</a>]</sup> which accrue interest falling to 1.64 per cent in December 2011, down from 2.28 per cent in November 2011.”</p> <p>That is a very different place from 6.9 per cent in December 2010 for the same measure. Conversely the annual <a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c05hist.xls" target="_blank"><b>growth rate in total debit purchases</b></a> (excluding cash out) was 13.4 per cent<sup>[<a href="#3">3</a>]</sup>.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index also shows that confidence in the general employment situation among Australians has significantly deteriorated, dropping notably from an optimistic 60.7 Index points to a pessimistic 39.2 Index points.</p> <p>These fears about general employment prospects were underscored by a corresponding drop in confidence about personal regular income which also significantly deteriorated from an optimistic 68.1 Index points to a neutral 57.1 Index points.</p> <p>“Even though Australia continues to have one of the lowest unemployment rates in the Western world, the highly publicised nature of recent job losses – especially in the banking and manufacturing sectors – look to be taking their toll on confidence in this area,” Cartwright added.</p> <p>The Index also shows that the different generations have varying consumer confidence levels, with respondents aged 30 and under having an average Index score of 54.9 compared to a far lower Index score of 31.8 for those above 30 years old.</p> <p>Now in its 20th year, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is one of Australia’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence surveys. The latest survey was conducted from December 2011 to February 2012 and involved 12,915 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 25 countries.</p> <p><a name="1"></a>[1]<i> December key figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, <a href="http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/FB435B0F7C83FA1DCA2579B2000DBD69?opendocument" target="_blank"><b>http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/FB435B0F7C83FA1DCA2579B2000DBD69?opendocument</b></a></i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a name="2"></a>[2] <i><b><a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c01hist.xls" target="_blank">http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c01hist.x</a><a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c01hist.xls" target="_blank">ls</a></b>Statistics from the monthly Reserve Bank Bulletin</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><a name="3"></a>[3]<i><b>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c05hist.xls" target="_blank">http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c05hist</a><a href="http://www.rba.gov.au/statistics/tables/xls/c05hist.xls" target="_blank">.xls</a></b> Statistics from the monthly Reserve Bank Bulletin</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> Notes to the editor<p>The Index is based on a survey that measures consumer confidence on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>For the full report go to: <b><a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/" target="_blank">www.masterintelligence.com</a></b></p> <p></p> mastercard research<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite of research products in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the flagship MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, MasterCard Worldwide Indexes of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping, Financial Literacy, and the recently launched inaugural Index of Global Destination Cities, all of which are released annually. In addition to the Index properties, MasterCard’s suite of research properties includes the MasterCard Worldwide Survey on Ethical Spending Behaviour and MasterCard Worldwide Survey on Consumer Purchasing Priorities series covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping, which are released annually.&nbsp;</p> <p>Besides these, MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports which include research and analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons. The MasterCard Indexes and Insights reports are available at <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.masterintelligence.com</b></a></p> <p></p> about mastercard worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contacts:<p>Georgette Tan<br> MasterCard Worldwide<br> <a href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com"><b>georgette_tan@mastercard.com</b></a><br> +65 6390 5971<br> <br> Robert O’Brien<br> Weber Shandwick<br> <a href="mailto:robrien@webershandwick.com"> <b>robrien@webershandwick.com</b></a><br> +65 6825 8064<br> </p> The MasterCard Worldwide IndexTM of Consumer Confidence (“Index”) is based on a survey conducted between November 2012 and December 2012 on 11,339 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/consumer-confidence-faces-further-decline2012-02-29T16:00:00.000Z2012-02-29T16:00:00.000ZOptimism in Africa Continues as Consumer Confidence in Morocco Highest Since 2009: MasterCard Index Jandre Nieuwoudt, Nadia EjazAt 94.1, Consumers in Morocco Show Highest Levels of Consumer Confidence in Africa <p><b><i>Casablanca, Morocco, 19 July 2012 -</i></b> <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">http://newsroom.mastercard.com/</a>) today revealed the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, which found that, with a score of 94.1, consumer confidence levels in Morocco are at an all-time high since the rollout of the Index in the market in 2009.</p> <p>Consumers in Morocco are very optimistic in their attitudes towards all five indicators measured in the Index. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, consumers are most optimistic about Employment (97.5 vs. 89.3), Economy (97.0 vs. 91.8) and Regular Income (96.2 vs. 87.9).&nbsp; All indicators of consumer confidence were rated as positive, including Quality of Life (94.5 vs. 86.2) and the Stock Market (85.5 vs. 80.6).</p> <p>The survey also highlighted that female respondents (96.5) tend to be more optimistic about their prospects for the coming months than their male counterparts (91.7) and that consumers&nbsp; under the age of 30 (95.6) are more optimistic than respondents over the age of 30 (93.0).</p> <p>“The consumer confidence score for Morocco is at its highest since the Index was rolled out in the market in 2009, highlighting the positive performance seen in the tourism sector in particular. Morocco’s continued growth has led to consistently positive scores in the last couple of years,” said Faissal Khdiri, senior vice-president, Northern &amp; Francophone Africa, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>Across Africa, the consumer confidence level is very optimistic at an average of 76.1, and this sentiment is reflected across all five indicators. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, respondents in Africa are most optimistic about Regular Income (88.3 vs. 83.2), Quality of Life (76.1 vs. 68.9) and the Economy (74.9 vs. 72.0). Consumer sentiment towards Employment (74.5 vs. 69.0) and the Stock Market (66.6 vs. 75.9) is also positive.&nbsp;<br> </p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 among 11,367 respondents aged 18 to 64 years in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Now in its 20th year in Asia/Pacific and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the Index is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.<i></i></p> <p></p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,367 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/ " target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p></p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/optimism-in-africa-continues-as-consumer-confidence-in-morocco-highest-since-2009-mastercard-index2012-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-07-18T16:00:00.000ZMiddle East Optimism Continues with Consumer Confidence in UAE Highest Since 2009: MasterCard Index Jandre Nieuwoudt, Nadia EjazUAE Consumer Confidence Level at 86.0 <p><b><i>Dubai, UAE, 19 July 2012 -</i></b> <b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">http://newsroom.mastercard.com/</a>)</b> today revealed the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, which found that, with a score of 86.0, consumer confidence levels in the UAE are at their highest since 2009.</p> <p>Consumers in the UAE are very optimistic in their attitudes towards all five indicators measured. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, consumers are most optimistic about Economy (89.1 vs. 84.4), Employment (88.9 vs. 82.2) and Quality of Life (88.6 vs. 89.3).&nbsp; All indicators of consumer confidence were rated as positive, including Regular Income (86.2 vs. 85.7) and the Stock Market (77.0 vs. 69.0).</p> <p>The survey also highlighted that female respondents (88.2) tend to be more optimistic about their prospects for the coming months than their male counterparts (84.0) and that consumers&nbsp; under the age of 30 (89.5) are more optimistic than respondents over the age of 30 (85.0).</p> <p>“The consumer confidence score for the UAE is at its highest since 2009, highlighting that the positive performance seen in key sectors like retail and hospitality is trickling down to impact consumer sentiment. The UAE’s continued growth has led to consistently high scores in the last couple of years,” said Eyad Al-Kourdi, vice president and country manager, UAE, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>Across the Middle East, the level of consumer confidence is very optimistic at an average of 83.5, and this sentiment is reflected across all five indicators. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, respondents in the Middle East are most optimistic about Regular Income (89.8 vs. 91.3), Employment (85.5 vs. 85.5) and the Economy (84.4 vs. 86.5). Consumer sentiment towards Quality of Life (82.9 vs. 87.6) and the Stock Market (74.9 vs. 77.8) is also positive.</p> <p>The Middle East’s aggregate score of 83.5 also remains higher than that of Asia/ Pacific (57.2) and Africa (76.1).</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 among 11,367 respondents aged 18 to 64 years in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Now in its 20th year in Asia/Pacific and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the Index is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p>Amongst other findings in the Middle East:</p> <ul> <li>Consumer confidence is highest in Qatar with a score of 96.6.</li> <li>All markets surveyed across the Middle East, with the exception of Lebanon, reflected positive levels of consumer confidence, with scores of 84 or higher.</li> <li>Consumer Confidence in Egypt is at a record high of 90.7. </li> </ul> Consumer Confidence Results: <table width="654" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.4</td> <td>55.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>96.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.5</td> <td>69.1</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.6</td> <td>76.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.3</td> <td>72.4</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> <td>75.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>83.5</td> <td>85.7</td> <td>82.8</td> <td>72.4</td> <td>70.1</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>52.5</td> <td>74.2</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,367 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/middleeast-optimism-continues-with-consumer-confidence-in-uae-highest-since-2009-mastercard-index2012-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-07-18T16:00:00.000ZMiddle East Optimism Continues with Consumer Confidence in Oman Remaining Very High: MasterCard Index Jandre Nieuwoudt, Nadia EjazOman Consumer Confidence Level at 91.5 <p><b><i>Muscat, Oman, 19 July 2012 -</i></b> <b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">http://newsroom.mastercard.com/</a></b>) today revealed the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, which found that, with a score of 91.5, consumer confidence levels in Oman are the second highest in the Middle East.</p> <p>Consumers in Oman are very optimistic in their attitudes towards all indicators measured in the Index. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, consumers are optimistic about Regular Income (96.8 vs. 94.5), Employment (95.7 vs. 96.5), and Economy (95.1 vs. 97.9), followed by Quality of Life (92.0 vs. 98.2) and Stock Market (77.8 vs. 80.6).&nbsp;</p> <p>The survey also highlighted that female respondents (91.8) tend to be optimistic about their prospects for the coming months almost as their male counterparts (91.2) whereas consumers under the age of 30 (93.0) are more optimistic than respondents over the age of 30 (90.9).</p> <p>“Since the rollout of the Index in Oman in 2011, the market has shown consistently high consumer confidence scores above 90. The findings are in line with Oman’s sustained growth in the first quarter of the year, and it is encouraging to see that consumers are optimistic about the rest of 2012 ” said Safdar Khan, market manager, Qatar, Oman &amp; Kuwait, MasterCard Worldwide.&nbsp;</p> <p>Across the Middle East, the level of consumer confidence is very optimistic at an average of 83.5, and this sentiment is reflected across all five indicators. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, respondents in the Middle East are most optimistic about Regular Income (89.8 vs. 91.3), Employment (85.5 vs. 85.5) and the Economy (84.4 vs. 86.5). Consumer sentiment towards Quality of Life (82.9 vs. 87.6) and the Stock Market (74.9 vs. 77.8) is also positive.</p> <p>The Middle East’s aggregate score of 83.5 also remains higher than that of Asia/ Pacific (57.2) and Africa (76.1).</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 among 11,367 respondents aged 18 to 64 years in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Now in its 20th year in Asia/Pacific and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the Index is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.<br> </p> <p>Source: <a href="http://www.arabianbusiness.com/oman-economic-outlook-remains-positive-cbank-465161.html" target="_blank"><b>http://www.arabianbusiness.com/oman-economic-outlook-remains-positive-cbank-465161.html</b></a></p> <p></p> <p></p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p>Amongst other findings in the Middle East:</p> <ul> <li>Consumer confidence is highest in Qatar with a score of 96.6.</li> <li>All markets surveyed across the Middle East, with the exception of Lebanon, reflected positive levels of consumer confidence, with scores of 84 or higher.</li> <li>Consumer Confidence in Egypt is at a record high of 90.7. </li> </ul> Consumer Confidence Results: <table width="654" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.4</td> <td>55.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>96.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.5</td> <td>69.1</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.6</td> <td>76.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.3</td> <td>72.4</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> <td>75.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>83.5</td> <td>85.7</td> <td>82.8</td> <td>72.4</td> <td>70.1</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>52.5</td> <td>74.2</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,367 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> <p><p></p> <p><p>&nbsp;</p> </p> </p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/middle-east-optimism-continues-with-consumer-confidence-in-oman-remaining-very-high-mastercard-index2012-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-07-18T16:00:00.000ZMiddle East Optimism Continues with Consumer Confidence Up in KSA: MasterCard Index Jandre Nieuwoudt, Nadia EjazKSA Consumer Confidence Level at 90.9<p><b><i>Riyadh, KSA, 19 July 2012 -</i></b> <b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">http://newsroom.mastercard.com/</a>)</b> today revealed the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, which found that, with a score of 90.9, consumer confidence levels in the Kingdom are increasing.</p> <p>Consumers in KSA are very optimistic in their attitudes towards all five indicators measured. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, consumers are most optimistic about Employment (96.7 vs. 85.1), Economy (96.0 vs. 89.1), and Regular Income (95.8 vs. 91.5).&nbsp; All indicators of consumer confidence were rated as positive, including the Stock Market (83.6 vs. 72.4) and Quality of Life (82.4 vs. 81.4).</p> <p>The survey also highlighted that female respondents (96.9) tend to be more optimistic about their prospects for the coming months than their male counterparts (88.4) and that consumers&nbsp; over the age of 30 (91.3) are more optimistic than respondents under the age of 30 (89.6).</p> <p>“Consumer confidence in KSA is on the rise, highlighting that consumers are positive about their prospects for the coming months. Saudi Arabia is developing rapidly, with new key developments set to position the country as a noteworthy destination and an attractive place to live and work for locals and expatriates alike,” said Khalid Hariry, market manager, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Pakistan.</p> <p>Across the Middle East, the level of consumer confidence is very optimistic at an average of 83.5, and this sentiment is reflected across all five indicators. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, respondents in the Middle East are most optimistic about Regular Income (89.8 vs. 91.3), Employment (85.5 vs. 85.5) and the Economy (84.4 vs. 86.5). Consumer sentiment towards Quality of Life (82.9 vs. 87.6) and the Stock Market (74.9 vs. 77.8) is also positive.</p> <p>The Middle East’s aggregate score of 83.5 also remains higher than that of Asia/ Pacific (57.2) and Africa (76.1).</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 among 11,367 respondents aged 18 to 64 years in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Now in its 20th year in Asia/Pacific and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the Index is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p>Amongst other findings in the Middle East:</p> <ul> <li>Consumer confidence is highest in Qatar with a score of 96.6.</li> <li>All markets surveyed across the Middle East, with the exception of Lebanon, reflected positive levels of consumer confidence, with scores of 84 or higher.</li> <li>Consumer Confidence in Egypt is at a record high of 90.7. </li> </ul> Consumer Confidence Results: <table width="654" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.4</td> <td>55.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>96.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.5</td> <td>69.1</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.6</td> <td>76.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.3</td> <td>72.4</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> <td>75.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>83.5</td> <td>85.7</td> <td>82.8</td> <td>72.4</td> <td>70.1</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>52.5</td> <td>74.2</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,367 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/middleeast-optimism-continues-with-consumer-confidence-up-in-ksa-mastercard-index2012-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-07-18T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Remains Very High in Middle East: MasterCard Index Jandre Nieuwoudt, Nadia EjazMiddle East Consumer Confidence Level at 83.5 <p><b><i>Dubai, UAE, July 19 2012</i></b><i> </i>–Consumers remain upbeat about the region’s future and its financial condition, according to the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup></b></a>&nbsp;of Consumer Confidence, released today. The aggregate Consumer Confidence score for the Middle East is very optimistic at 83.5.</p> <p>The survey, conducted among 11,367 respondents between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 in 25 countries, recorded a very optimistic score for Middle East consumer confidence, bringing the index to (83.5), significantly higher than Africa (76.1) and Asia Pacific (57.2).</p> <p>In the Middle East<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup>, Qatar topped the index with a remarkable score (96.6); followed by</p> <p>Oman (91.5), Saudi Arabia (90.9), Egypt (90.7), United Arab Emirates (86.0) and Lebanon (44.3). The score for Egypt is at a record high (90.7), highlighting the positive sentiment among consumers amid the country’s recent political changes. India (82.1) was ranked as the most optimistic nation in Asia, whilst Morocco (94.1) moved past Nigeria (91.4) to gain the top spot in Africa.</p> <p>Now in its 20th year and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic 100 as the most optimistic.<i> The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard’s financial performance.</i></p> <p>Consumer confidence in the Middle East is very optimistic at 83.5, and this sentiment is reflected across all five indicators. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, respondents in the Middle East are most optimistic about Regular Income (89.8 vs. 91.3), Employment (85.5 vs. 85.5) and the Economy (84.4 vs. 86.5). Consumer sentiment towards Quality of Life (82.9 vs. 87.6) and the Stock Market (74.9 vs. 77.8) is also positive.&nbsp;<br> </p> <p>The Middle East’s aggregate score of 83.5 remains higher than that of Asia/ Pacific (57.2) and Africa (76.1).</p> <table width="375" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><br type="_moz"> </th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>H1 2012 Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>Change from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Middle East</b></td> <td>83.5</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>-2.2</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Egypt</b></td> <td>90.7</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>2.4</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Kuwait</b></td> <td>84.7</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>-3.5</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Lebanon</b></td> <td>44.3</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-26.2</td> <td>Extreme Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Oman</b></td> <td>91.5</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>-2.1</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Qatar</b></td> <td>96.6</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>3.0</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Saudi Arabia</b></td> <td>90.9</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>7.0</td> <td>Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>United Arab Emirates</b></td> <td>86.0</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>3.8</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><a name="1"></a>[1] <i>Middle East: Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,367 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/ " target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/consumer-confidence-remains-very-high-in-middle-east-mastercard-index2012-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-07-18T16:00:00.000ZMiddle East Optimism Continues with Consumer Confidence in Qatar Highest in Middle East: MasterCard Index Jandre Nieuwoudt, Nadia EjazQatar Consumer Confidence Level at 96.6 <p><b><i>Doha, Qatar, 19 July 2012 -</i></b> <b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/">http://newsroom.mastercard.com/</a>)</b> today revealed the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, which found that, with a score of 96.6, consumer confidence levels in Qatar are the highest in the Middle East.</p> <p>Consumers in Qatar are very optimistic in their attitudes towards all five indicators measured in the Index. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, consumers are most optimistic about Economy (98.7 vs. 97.3), Regular Income (98.4 vs. 89.2) and Employment (97.8 vs. 95.4).&nbsp; All indicators of consumer confidence were rated as positive, including Quality of Life (96.9 vs. 95.5) and the Stock Market (91.1 vs. 90.3).</p> <p>The survey also highlighted that female (96.6) and male respondents (96.6) tend to be equally optimistic about their prospects for the coming months and that consumers over the age of 30 (96.8) are more optimistic than respondents under the age of 30 (95.8).</p> <p>“At 96.6, the consumer confidence level in Qatar is the highest in the Middle East. These results reflect the sustained growth in the market, and with surely be positive news for businesses in Qatar,” said Safdar Khan, market manager, Qatar, Oman &amp; Kuwait, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>Across the Middle East, the level of consumer confidence is very optimistic at an average of 83.5, and this sentiment is reflected across all five indicators. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, respondents in the Middle East are most optimistic about Regular Income (89.8 vs. 91.3), Employment (85.5 vs. 85.5) and the Economy (84.4 vs. 86.5). Consumer sentiment towards Quality of Life (82.9 vs. 87.6) and the Stock Market (74.9 vs. 77.8) is also positive.</p> <p>The Middle East’s aggregate score of 83.5 also remains higher than that of Asia/ Pacific (57.2) and Africa (76.1).</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 among 11,367 respondents aged 18 to 64 years in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Now in its 20th year in Asia/Pacific and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the Index is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.<i></i></p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p>Amongst other findings in the Middle East:</p> <ul> <li>Consumer confidence is highest in Qatar with a score of 96.6.</li> <li>All markets surveyed across the Middle East, with the exception of Lebanon, reflected positive levels of consumer confidence, with scores of 84 or higher.</li> <li>&nbsp;Consumer Confidence in Egypt is at a record high of 90.7.</li> </ul> <p><b><i>Consumer Confidence Results:</i></b></p> <table width="654" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.4</td> <td>55.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>96.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.5</td> <td>69.1</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.6</td> <td>76.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.3</td> <td>72.4</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> <td>75.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>83.5</td> <td>85.7</td> <td>82.8</td> <td>72.4</td> <td>70.1</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>52.5</td> <td>74.2</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,367 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/ " target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/middle-east-optimism-continues-with-consumer-confidence-in-qatar-highest-in-middle-east-mastercard-index2012-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-07-18T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Surges in Middle East: MasterCard Index Georgette TanAll 7 Middle East Markets Record Positive Sentiment across Four Key Indicators<p><b><i>Dubai, UAE, April 17 2012</i></b><i> </i>– Despite the continuing economic challenges, consumers still remain upbeat about the region’s future and its financial condition, according to the latest <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/"><b>MasterCard Worldwide</b></a> Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, released today.</p> <p>The survey conducted on 12,915 respondents between 5 December 2011 and 8 February 2012 in 25 countries, recorded a three-point rise in Middle East consumer confidence from the previous six month period, bringing the index to (85.7), significantly higher than Africa (73.8) and Asia Pacific (52.1).</p> <p>In the Middle East<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup>, Qatar and Oman topped the index with a remarkable score (93.6); followed closely by Egypt (88.3), Kuwait (88.3), Saudi Arabia (83.9) and the United Arab Emirates (82.1). Lebanon showed the highest increase in consumer sentiment (70.5), up by 46.4 points over the last six months. India (81.2) - one among the largest economies in the world, was ranked as the most optimistic nation in Asia, whilst Nigeria (96.4) retained the top spot in Africa, followed by Morocco (87.2).</p> <p>Now in its 20th year and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic 100 as the most optimistic.<i> The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard’s financial performance.</i></p> <p><i></i><a name="1"></a>[1] <i>Middle East: Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates</i></p> <p></p> <p></p> Reforms and fundamental changes boost Middle East consumer sentiment <p>Six out of the seven Middle East markets polled recorded an increase in 4 key indicators which include Regular Income (86.3 to 91.3 Index points), Employment (82.9 to 85.5 Index points), Economy (82.5 to 86.5 Index points), and Quality of Life (81.5 to 87.6 Index points). Only the Stock Market indicator registered a decline (81.0 to77.8 Index points).</p> <p>The positive indicators are viewed as the result of enhanced reforms within the region and introduction of new socio-economic opportunities, especially for young people, resulting in significantly improved overall growth forecasts.</p> Oil concerns consequential to a deterioration in some parts of the Middle East<p>While the overall consumer confidence remained positive in the Middle East, concerns over future oil demand; rising food prices and housing components led to a significant deterioration in Saudi Arabia (down 14.5 Index points) and UAE (down 10.8 Index points).</p> <p>Minor deteriorations were also recorded in Qatar (down 6.1 Index points) and Oman (down 5.2 Index points) while Kuwait remained stable (88.3). Increase (up 12.9 Index points) in consumer optimism, makes Egypt a structurally bullish story which is largely attributed to the regime change last year</p> <p>If consumer sentiment reflects economic growth over the next six months within the Middle East, the region will remain an exciting story.</p> <table width="553" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><br type="_moz"> </th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>H2 2011 Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>Change from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Middle East </b></td> <td>85.7</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>2.9</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Egypt</b></td> <td>88.3</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>12.9</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Kuwait</b></td> <td>88.3</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>-2.3</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Lebanon</b></td> <td>70.5</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>46.4</td> <td>Extreme Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Oman</b></td> <td>93.6</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>-5.2</td> <td>Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Qatar</b></td> <td>93.6</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>-6.1</td> <td>Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Saudi Arabia</b><b><sub></sub></b></td> <td>83.9</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>-14.5</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>United Arab Emirates</b></td> <td>82.1</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>-10.8</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 5 December 2011 to 8February 2012. A total of 12,915 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/ " target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/consumer-confidence-surges-in-middle-east-mastercard-index2012-04-16T16:00:00.000Z2012-04-16T16:00:00.000ZMiddle East Optimism Continues with Consumer Confidence in Kuwait Very High: MasterCard Index Jandre Nieuwoudt, Nadia EjazKuwait Consumer Confidence Level at 84.7<p><b><i>Kuwait City, Kuwait, 19 July 2012 -</i></b> <b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">http://newsroom.mastercard.com/</a>)</b> today revealed the results of the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> of Consumer Confidence, which found that, with a score of 84.7, consumer confidence levels in Kuwait are very optimistic.</p> <p>Consumers in Kuwait are very optimistic in their attitudes towards most of the indicators measured in the Index. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, consumers are most optimistic about Regular Income (96.2 vs. 93.8), Quality of Life (91.3 vs. 90.5) and Employment (88.8 vs. 88.4).&nbsp; These were followed by Economy (88.3 vs. 86.5) and Stock Market (59.0 vs. 82.0).</p> <p>The survey also highlighted that male respondents (87.1) tend to be more optimistic about their prospects for the coming months than their female counterparts (82.3) and that consumers&nbsp; under the age of 30 (85.5) are more optimistic than respondents over the age of 30 (84.4).</p> <p>“The consumer confidence score for Kuwait has remained consistently high for the last few years, in part due to its bullish economy. This sentiment is supported by analysts’ expectations that Kuwait is projected to post the largest surplus of GDP for the current fiscal year,” said Safdar Khan, market manager, Qatar, Oman &amp; Kuwait, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>Across the Middle East, the level of consumer confidence is very optimistic at an average of 83.5, and this sentiment is reflected across all five indicators. When compared to the previous edition of the Index released 6 months ago, respondents in the Middle East are most optimistic about Regular Income (89.8 vs. 91.3), Employment (85.5 vs. 85.5) and the Economy (84.4 vs. 86.5). Consumer sentiment towards Quality of Life (82.9 vs. 87.6) and the Stock Market (74.9 vs. 77.8) is also positive.</p> <p>The Middle East’s aggregate score of 83.5 also remains higher than that of Asia/ Pacific (57.2) and Africa (76.1).</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 among 11,367 respondents aged 18 to 64 years in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Now in its 20th year in Asia/Pacific and its 9th year in the Middle East and Africa, the Index is the region’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market over the next six months, based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.<i></i></p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<p>Amongst other findings in the Middle East:</p> <ul> <li>Consumer confidence is highest in Qatar with a score of 96.6.</li> <li>All markets surveyed across the Middle East, with the exception of Lebanon, reflected positive levels of consumer confidence, with scores of 84 or higher.</li> <li>Consumer Confidence in Egypt is at a record high of 90.7.</li> </ul> Consumer Confidence Results:<table width="654" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.4</td> <td>55.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.7</td> <td>96.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.5</td> <td>69.1</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.6</td> <td>76.2</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.3</td> <td>72.4</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> <td>75.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>83.5</td> <td>85.7</td> <td>82.8</td> <td>72.4</td> <td>70.1</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>52.5</td> <td>74.2</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,367 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/middleeast-optimism-continues-with-consumer-confidence-in-kuwait-very-high-mastercard-index2012-07-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-07-18T16:00:00.000ZJapan Records Eight-Year High in Consumer Confidence: MasterCard Index Georgette Tan Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p></p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contacts<p>Georgette Tan<br> MasterCard<br> <a href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com">georgette_tan@mastercard.com</a><br> +65 6390 5971<br> <br> Samantha Yong<br> Weber Shandwick<br> <a href="mailto:samyong@webershandwick.com">samyong@webershandwick.com</a><br> +65 6825 8053</p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/japan-records-eight-year-high-in-consumer-confidence-mastercard-index2013-06-24T16:00:00.000Z2013-06-24T16:00:00.000ZIndonesia Tops Consumer Confidence in Asia/Pacific: MasterCard Index Julianty Moeljono, Thoriq HuseinMethodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 7 November to 23 December 2012. A total of 11,339 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contacts<p>Julianty Moeljono,<br> MasterCard Worldwide<br> <a href="mailto:julianty_moeljono@mastercard.com">julianty_moeljono@mastercard.com</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> Thoriq Husein<br> Weber Shandwick,<br> <a href="mailto:thusein@webershandwick.com"> thusein@webershandwick.com</a><i></i></p> <p></p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/indonesia-tops-consumer-confidence-in-asia-pacific--mastercard-i2013-02-24T16:00:00.000Z2013-02-24T16:00:00.000ZSouth African Consumers Maintain Optimistic Outlook – MasterCard Index Birgit DeibeleIncreases recorded on all five MasterCard Consumer Confidence Index Indicators<p><b><i>Johannesburg, 19<sup>th</sup> September 2012</i></b> – South African consumer confidence has maintained a positive year-on-year outlook according to the latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, released today.</p> <p>The survey recorded an overall increase of two points in South African consumer confidence to a current score of 69.8 compared to 2011, when a score of 67.8 was recorded.</p> <p>Now in its eighth year in South Africa, the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa (APMEA) region’s most comprehensive consumer confidence survey. The Index is based on a survey which measures consumer confidence on prevailing expectations in the market for the next six months based on five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.</p> <p>The most recent survey was conducted between 24<sup>th</sup> April 2012 and 10<sup>th</sup> June 2012, and involved 11,376 respondents aged 18 to 64 across 25 markets across the Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa regions.<sup>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</sup>&nbsp; On the African continent, the survey was conducted in Egypt, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria and South Africa. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard financial performance.</i></p> <p>“The latest Index results show an overall year-on-year increase in optimism with all five of the key indicators that make up the consumer confidence score recording increases. This indicates that South Africans are feeling encouragingly positive about the next six months” said Philip Panaino, division president, South Africa, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> <p>“The latest consumer confidence score for South Africa shows a remarkable degree of alignment with the South African Reserve Bank statistics showing that increases in South African household credit extension (6.8%), household consumption expenditure on semi-durables (6.3%), money supply (6.4%) and fixed capital formation (5.8%) have been recorded,” Panaino adds.</p> <p>The highest increase in optimism compared to the same period in 2011 came from the Stock Market indicator, which increased by 3.8 points from 62.9 to 66.7.</p> <p>Independent economist Dr. Roelof Botha explains that this is not surprising when viewed against the background of an increase in the JSE’s All share index (Alsi) of more than 7% between February 2011 and February 2012,” says Botha. “The market capitalisation of the JSE, as reflected by the Alsi, has now increased by more than 90% since bottoming out in early 2009, while the average dividend yield on the JSE has increased by more than 50% over the past two years.</p> <p>The Index result for Regular Income yielded the highest overall result at 80.3, even though it increased by just 2.7 points in comparison to the same period in 2011. According to Botha, higher dividends, combined with sustained increases in formal sector salaries, lie at the heart of the improvement in the MasterCard Index for Regular Income.</p> <p>The increase in expectations of Regular Income was mirrored by the increase seen in South Africans’ expectations of their Quality of Life, which also rose by 2.7 points to a score of 70. “This marker is usually the one closest aligned to the overall MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence score for a particular market, as the state of the economy, employment opportunities and regular income all contribute to the ability of consumers to maintain or improve their standard of living,” Panaino points out.</p> <p>“Another key factor is also at play in the assessment of the quality of living conditions,” Botha adds. “The relatively high level of optimism would have been influenced by a fairly sharp improvement in the affordability of mortgage financing. Home owners are now in a position to afford a mortgage loan that is virtually double the value of what they would have qualified for three years ago. This fortuitous development is as a result of a combination of a 36% increase &nbsp;in the country’s average nominal salary and a 39% decline&nbsp; in the prime overdraft rate since the first quarter of 2009.”</p> <p>When asked if they expected their employment prospects to deteriorate, improve or remain the same in the coming six months, South Africans revealed their confidence in the job market with this indicator rising by 2.1 points to an optimistic result of 67.8.</p> <p>The Economy indicator rose marginally from 63.2 in 2011 to 64.2 in 2012.&nbsp; “There’s a current real GDP growth trajectory of close to 3%, an increase in total real household consumption expenditure and retail sales of 3.7% and 5%, respectively (over the past year) and a return to formal sector job creation, which are likely contributors to the increase in confidence in the economy,” explains Botha.</p> <p>“It’s encouraging that South African consumer sentiment for the next six months is positive. However, the South African consumer confidence level is still off its historical peak of 91.1 points in the second half of 2006, and is below South Africa’s historical average of 71.3 since the survey was first conducted at the beginning of 2004,” says Panaino.</p> <p>When comparing the South African results to the rest of Africa, the only African market to yield a lower result than South Africa was Kenya, with a score of 49, while Morocco showed the highest level of optimism with a score of 94.1, closely followed by Nigeria at 91.4 and Egypt at 90.7.</p> <p>“South Africa is poised to benefit from high economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, where a spate of large new mining and energy development projects are being implemented. Against this background, the consolidation phase of economic recovery, which has lasted for three years, is bound to progress towards a new growth range of around 4%. Such a prospect is supported by the enhanced level of confidence for the remainder of 2012, evident from the latest MasterCard Consumer Confidence Index,” concludes Botha.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><b>[1<a name="1"></a>] </b><b><i>Asia Pacific</i></b><i>: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Phillipines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. <b>Middle East:</b> Egypt, Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates. <b>Africa:</b> Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa</i></p> <p><i><br type="_moz"> </i></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via Internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. &nbsp;</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/south-african-consumers-maintain-optimistic-outlook-mastercard-index2012-09-18T16:00:00.000Z2012-09-18T16:00:00.000ZGender Gap Emerges Over Consumer Confidence Chris LawrenceAustralian Women Not so Optimistic About 2013 Outlook<p><b><i>Australia, February 7<sup>th </sup>2012</i></b>: The latest <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b> </a>consumer confidence index has revealed a significant difference in sentiment between women and men.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup> Index of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) found Australian women scored a pessimistic 34.4 out of a possible score of 100 in consumer confidence. The finding takes into account views on employment, the economy, regular income, the stock market and quality of life for the coming six months.</p> <p>This stands in contrast to sentiment among Australian men, who scored a comparatively buoyant (though far from optimistic) 46.5. Overall Australia scored 40.3, a figure that remained stable with the previous index score of 39.2 six months ago and positioned the country as the fourth least optimistic of the 14 markets surveyed in the region.&nbsp;</p> <p>MasterCard Australia Country Manager, Andrew Cartwright says the solemn consumer mood is reinforced by payment industry figures.</p> <p>“<a href="http://www.mastercard.com.au/mc_papers.html"><b>Payment data</b></a> reflects consumer sentiment. RBA data over the past few years has shown that when it comes to spending, Australians are taking a conservative approach preferring to pay down debt than extend it.</p> <p>“In the last year, the total credit card balances accruing interest in Australia fell by over $1 billion – about 3%. That’s a sure sign that consumers are feeling cautious.</p> <p>“At the same time Debit card spending has continued to grow at double digit rates driven by Australians’ continued shift toward using their own money for purchases.”</p> <p>The report found the primary concerns for Australian women included quality of life, which registered a low score of 29.3, and employment with a similarly low 23. The findings follow the most recent unemployment data from the <a href="http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/latestProducts/6202.0Media%20Release1Dec%202012" target="_blank"><b>Australian Bureau of Statistics</b></a> in December, which revealed the unemployment rate has risen slightly to 5.4 per cent (from 5.3 percent in November).<sup>1</sup></p> <p>The index found the most optimistic country in Asia/Pacific is Indonesia (87.5), while the most pessimistic country in the region was Japan (23.7). Consumer confidence across the entire Asia/Pacific region scored 59.7.</p> <p>For the latest MasterCard news <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank"><b>click here</b></a></p> <p></p> Contact:<p>For media enquiries, please contact Chris Lawrence at The Origin Agency<br> <a href="mailto:Chris.lawrence@originagency.com.au">Chris.lawrence@originagency.com.au</a><br> 02 8281 3295 / 0415 302 701<br> </p> Methodology:<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 7 November 2012 and 23 December 2012 on 11,339 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 25 countries. This is the 40<sup>th</sup> survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993.</p> <p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6 month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> <p><b>MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence Australia:</b></p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="504"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>Component</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>Change from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Employment</td> <td>30.1</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>1.1</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td>Economy</td> <td>36</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>5.4</td> <td>Some improvement</td> </tr><tr><td>Regular income</td> <td>55.8</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>-4.2</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td>Stock market</td> <td>43.5</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-1.3</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td>Quality of life</td> <td>36.1</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>4.5</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><b>Notes to the editor:</b></p> <p><sup>1</sup>Australia's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased 0.1 percentage points to 5.4 per cent in December, as announced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). <a href="http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/latestProducts/6202.0Media%20Release1Dec%202012" target="_blank"><b>http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/latestProducts/6202.0Media%20Release1Dec%202012</b></a></p> <p></p> About MasterCard:<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/gender-gap-emerges-over-consumer-confidence2012-02-06T16:00:00.000Z2012-02-06T16:00:00.000ZAsia/Pacific Markets Bounce Back as Consumer Confidence Rises: MasterCard Index Region Bounces Back with Nine out of 14 Markets Showing Improved Confidence Across Five Key Economic Indicators Led by Hong Kong, South Korea and Malaysia<p style="text-align: center;"><i>To tweet this news, copy and paste&nbsp;<a href="http://bit.ly/OhuCXw"><b>http://bit.ly/OhuCXw</b></a></i><i>&nbsp;</i><i>to your Twitter handle with the hashtag #MasterCard, #ConsumerConfidence</i></p> <p><i>Singapore, 15 August 2012</i><i>&nbsp;</i>– Consumer confidence has picked up across Asia/Pacific markets as concerns about slow growth lessen in the region, according to the latest&nbsp;<b><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">MasterCard Worldwide</a></b><b>&nbsp;</b>Index<sup>TM</sup>&nbsp;of Consumer Confidence, released today.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>TM</sup>&nbsp;of Consumer Confidence (“Index”) is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 on 11,376 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. This is the 39<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;survey of consumer confidence conducted since 1993. Now in its 20th year the Index is Asia/Pacific’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp;<i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard’s financial performance.</i></p> <p>Consumers in the region remain most optimistic in the markets of India (82.1 Index points), China (77.4), Vietnam (77.2) and Thailand (75.8), while the least optimistic markets are Japan (23.6), Taiwan (25.7) and Australia (39.2).</p> <p><img width="465" height="784" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/asiapacific2012.jpg"></p> <p>Overall, nine out of 14 Asia/Pacific<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/press-releases/asiapacific-markets-bounce-back-as-consumer-confidence-rises-mastercard-index/#_ftn1">[1]</a>&nbsp;markets polled recorded positive improvements when compared to the second&nbsp;half of 2011 with a regional rise&nbsp;from 52.1 Index points in the second half of 2011 to 57.2 Index points in the first half of 2012. The last MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence showed an improvement in sentiment for only five out of the 14 markets. For the region as a whole increases were recorded across all key indicators of regular income (from 64.5 to 71.9 Index points), employment (49.3 to 54.0 Index points), economy (49.3 to 51.8 Index points), quality of life (49.6 to 51.7 Index points) and stock market (47.9 to 56.5 Index points).</p> <p>Hong Kong, which dropped 38.7 Index points in the last Index, improved by 21.9 Index points to lead the region, followed closely by South Korea (up 21.4 Index points), Malaysia (up 17.1 Index points) and New Zealand (up 15.3 Index points).</p> <p>Indonesia recorded the single largest deterioration in consumer confidence (down 18.7 Index points) followed by the Philippines (down 11.8 Index points). Consumer confidence in the economy plummeted in Indonesia (from 74.9 to 33.3 Index Points), with employment also falling from 70.6 to 40.8 Index Points.</p> <p>“The latest reading of consumer confidence in Asia/Pacific reflects the increasingly complex mix of key influences affecting the region. The first is the global environment, which continues to be weak and riddled with uncertainty, especially in Europe. The second is the slowdown in China, which has been affecting many key regional markets that are China-centric in their exports. The third is the strength of the domestic markets in sustaining growth with home-grown demand. While the global environment affects all markets in Asia/Pacific, the slowdown in China has had more severe impact on Australia, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. On the other hand, Vietnam has been a major beneficiary of low end manufacturing relocating from China in the recent past. India, being the least dependent on either global or China demand, is by far the most domestic oriented among the key markets in the region. It’s relative optimism reflects the perception that the economy has become more stable after growth declining for two years,” said&nbsp;<b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a></b>, global economic advisor, MasterCard Worldwide.</p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence—1st half 2012<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="1" border="1"> <tbody><tr><td>&nbsp;</td> <th colspan="2"><b>H1 2012 current status</b></th> <th colspan="2"><b>Change from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Asia Pacific</b></td> <td>57.2</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>5.1</td> <td>Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Australia</b></td> <td>39.2</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-4.1</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>China</b></td> <td>77.4</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>12.6</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Hong Kong</b></td> <td>51.8</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>21.9</td> <td>Extreme Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>India</b></td> <td>82.1</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>0.9</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Indonesia</b></td> <td>57.4</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>-18.7</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Japan</b></td> <td>23.6</td> <td>Very Pessimistic</td> <td>7.4</td> <td>Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>South Korea</b></td> <td>51.3</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>21.4</td> <td>Extreme Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Malaysia</b></td> <td>69.9</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>17.1</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>New Zealand</b></td> <td>51.0</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>15.3</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Philippines</b></td> <td>65.2</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>-11.8</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Singapore</b></td> <td>52.9</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>2.9</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Taiwan</b></td> <td>25.7</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-4.4</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Thailand</b></td> <td>75.8</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>11.9</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Vietnam</b></td> <td>77.2</td> <td>Very Optimsitic</td> <td>-1.6</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 24 April 2012 to 10 June 2012. A total of 11,376 respondents qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers’ thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/ViewRegion.jsp?hidReportTypeId=4&amp;hidUserId=null">MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, Online Shopping,&nbsp;<a href="http://masterintelligence.com/ViewInsights.jsp?hidReportTypeId=1&amp;hidSectionId=191&amp;hidReport=265&amp;hidReportSection=1208&amp;hidViewType=null&amp;hidUserId=null">Index of Financial Literacy</a>, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://insights.mastercard.com/white-papers/mastercard-index-of-global-destination-cities-cross-border-travel-and-expenditures/" target="_blank">Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/ethical%20shopping.jsp">Ethical Spending</a>&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/ViewRegion.jsp?hidReportTypeId=7&amp;hidUserId=null">Consumer Purchasing Priorities</a>&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/ViewRegionReport.jsp?hidReportTypeId=7&amp;hidRegionId=1&amp;hidUserId=null">Travel</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/ViewRegionReport.jsp?hidReportTypeId=7&amp;hidRegionId=1&amp;hidUserId=null">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>, Education,<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/ViewRegionReport.jsp?hidReportTypeId=7&amp;hidRegionId=1&amp;hidUserId=null">Money Management</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/ViewRegionReport.jsp?hidReportTypeId=7&amp;hidRegionId=1&amp;hidUserId=null">Luxury</a>&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard Worldwide<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/mastercardnews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a><b>, &nbsp;</b>join the conversation on <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank">Cashless Conversations Blog</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank">subscribe</a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">news</a>.</p> The MasterCard Worldwide IndexTM of Consumer Confidence (“Index”) is based on a survey conducted between 24 April 2012 and 10 June 2012 on 11,376 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2012/asia-pacific-markets-bounce-back-as-consumer-confidence-rises--m2012-08-14T16:00:00.000Z2012-08-14T16:00:00.000ZHong Kong’s Consumer Confidence Peaks Since 12 Months Ago: MasterCard Index Gloria Lai, Matthew LiuHong Kong’s Index of Consumer Confidence over the Past Five Years<table width="411" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description">H1<br> 2008</th> <th class="table-description">H2<br> 2008</th> <th class="table-description">H1<br> 2009</th> <th class="table-description">H2<br> 2009</th> <th class="table-description">H1<br> 2010</th> <th class="table-description">H2<br> 2010</th> <th class="table-description">H1<br> 2011</th> <th class="table-description">H2<br> 2011</th> <th class="table-description">H1<br> 2012</th> <th class="table-description">H2<br> 2012</th> </tr><tr><td><b>Employment</b></td> <td>88.2</td> <td>41.7</td> <td>16.2</td> <td>67.4</td> <td>83.3</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>70.4</td> <td>25.7</td> <td>58.0</td> <td>56.9</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Economy</b></td> <td>88.9</td> <td>28.4</td> <td>23.2</td> <td>68.3</td> <td>83.8</td> <td>77.9</td> <td>66.4</td> <td>19.9</td> <td>41.3</td> <td>47.0</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Regular Income</b></td> <td>91.7</td> <td>66.4</td> <td>26.5</td> <td>53.2</td> <td>75.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>80.6</td> <td>59.4</td> <td>78.8</td> <td>83.6</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Stock Market</b></td> <td>71.2</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>37.7</td> <td>63.2</td> <td>79.2</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>79.1</td> <td>23.3</td> <td>39.4</td> <td>63.9</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Quality of Life</b></td> <td>75.5</td> <td>48.6</td> <td>20.0</td> <td>48.0</td> <td>61.7</td> <td>57.7</td> <td>46.3</td> <td>21.1</td> <td>41.8</td> <td>43.1</td> </tr><tr><td><b>MasterIndex</b></td> <td>83.1</td> <td>41.8</td> <td>24.7</td> <td>60.0</td> <td>76.6</td> <td>74.7</td> <td>68.6</td> <td>29.9</td> <td>51.8</td> <td>58.9</td> </tr></tbody></table> <p>Kevin Goldmintz, head of Hong Kong and Macau, MasterCard Worldwide, said “We are pleased to see consumer sentiment in Hong Kong now at its highest over the past 12 months, with very optimistic expectations on regular income and positive outlook on the stock market. In spite of the potential influence of global economic issues and the slowdown of China’s economic growth, it is encouraging to see Hong Kong consumers remaining positive on the overall economic situation.”</p> <p>Consumer sentiment in China is very optimistic with an overall score of 81.8 Index points, an increase of 4.3 Index points from six months ago. Chinese consumers have a positive outlook across all five key indicators and continue to be extremely optimistic on Regular Income (94.8 Index points). Among the Chinese cities polled, consumers in Beijing continue to remain the most confident (84.4 Index points), followed by those in Guangzhou (79.7 Index points) and Shanghai (78.3 Index points).</p> <p>Despite some improvement in overall sentiment, Taiwanese consumers remain pessimistic, with an overall score of 33.1 Index points, compared to 25.7 Index points six months ago. Local respondents remain negative on most key indicators, despite significant improvement on Stock Market (from 29.4 to 45.8 Index points) and Economy (from 18.4 to 28.9 Index points).</p> <p>In the Asia/Pacific region, nine out of 14 markets polled recorded positive improvements in sentiment. Overall, Asia/Pacific saw a slight improvement from 57.2 Index points in the first half of 2012 to 59.7 in the second half of 2012.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index<sup>™</sup> of Consumer Confidence (“Index”) is based on a survey conducted between November and December 2012 of 11,339 respondents aged 18–64 in 25 countries within Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa. This is the 40<sup>th</sup> survey of consumer confidence conducted since 1993. Now in its 20th year, the Index is Asia/Pacific’s most comprehensive and longest running consumer confidence survey. The Index score is calculated with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral. <i>The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard’s financial performance.</i></p> MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence<table width="405" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2">H2 2012 Current Status</th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2">Change from last half</th> </tr><tr><td><b>Asia Pacific</b></td> <td>59.7</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>2.6</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Australia</b></td> <td>40.3</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>1.1</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>China</b></td> <td>81.8</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>4.3</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Hong Kong</b></td> <td>58.9</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>7.1</td> <td>Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>India</b></td> <td>85.5</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>3.4</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Indonesia</b></td> <td>87.5</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>30.1</td> <td>Extreme Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Japan</b></td> <td>23.7</td> <td>Very Pessimistic</td> <td>0.1</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>South Korea</b></td> <td>38.6</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-12.6</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Malaysia</b></td> <td>71.3</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>1.4</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>New Zealand</b></td> <td>42.7</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-8.3</td> <td>Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Philippines</b></td> <td>78.8</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>13.6</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Singapore</b></td> <td>50.0</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>-2.9</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Taiwan</b></td> <td>33.1</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>7.4</td> <td>Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Thailand</b></td> <td>69.6</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>-6.2</td> <td>Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Vietnam</b></td> <td>74.5</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>-2.6</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from November 2012 to December 2012. A total of 11,339 respondents qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">Index of Global Destination Cities</a>.</b> In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<b><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>,</b> Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contacts:<p>Gloria Lai<br> (852) 2533 9983,<br> <a href="mailto:glai@webershandwick.com">glai@webershandwick.com</a><br> </p> <p>Matthew Liu<br> (852) 2533 9927,<br> <a href="mailto:mliu@webershandwick.com">mliu@webershandwick.com</a></p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/hong-kong-s-consumer-confidence-peaks-since-12-months-ago--mastercard-index2013-02-25T16:00:00.000Z2013-02-25T16:00:00.000ZUAE Consumer Confidence on the Rise: MasterCard Index Jandré Nieuwoudt Middle East Consumer Confidence Results: <table width="403" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2009</b></th> </tr><tr><td>Egypt</td> <td>66.6</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> <td>32.4</td> </tr><tr><td>Kuwait</td> <td>95.8</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>49.7</td> </tr><tr><td>Lebanon</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> <td>64.5</td> </tr><tr><td>Oman</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><td>Qatar</td> <td>96.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> <td>71.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Saudi Arabia</td> <td>95.2</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> <td>67.3</td> </tr><tr><td>U.A.E.</td> <td>91.4</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> <td>29.6</td> </tr><tr><td>Total Middle East</td> <td>81.1</td> <td>83.5</td> <td>85.7</td> <td>82.8</td> <td>72.4</td> <td>70.1</td> <td>74.1</td> <td>52.5</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 7 November to 23 December 2012. A total of 11,339 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Media Contacts<p>Jandré Nieuwoudt,<br> GolinHarris Dubai,<br> +971 50 248 3351,<br> <a href="mailto:jnieuwoudt@golinharris.ae">jnieuwoudt@golinharris.ae</a></p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/uae-consumer-confidence-on-the-rise--mastercard-index2013-03-11T16:00:00.000Z2013-03-11T16:00:00.000ZConsumers 'Extremely Optimistic' in Saudi Arabia: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results<p></p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="1" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description">MARKETS</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2010</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2010</th> </tr><tr><th>Egypt</th> <td>54.1</td> <td>66.6</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> </tr><tr><th>Kuwait</th> <td>96.8</td> <td>95.8</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> </tr><tr><th>Lebanon</th> <td>26.9</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> </tr><tr><th>Oman</th> <td>87.1</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><th>Qatar</th> <td>96.4</td> <td>96.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> </tr><tr><th>Saudi Arabia</th> <td>93.3</td> <td>95.2</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> </tr><tr><th>U.A.E.</th> <td>94.7</td> <td>91.4</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> </tr><tr><th>Total Middle East</th> <td><b>78.5</b></td> <td><b>91.1</b></td> <td><b>83.5</b></td> <td><b>85.7</b></td> <td><b>82.8</b></td> <td><b>72.4</b></td> <td><b>70.1</b></td> <td><b>74.1</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i></p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.&nbsp;</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market. &nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contact<p>Jandré Nieuwoudt<br> GolinHarris<br> Dubai<br> +971 4 3323308<br> <a href="mailto:jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com">jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com</a></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/consumers-_extremely-optimistic-in-saudi-arabia--mastercard-inde2013-08-26T16:00:00.000Z2013-08-26T16:00:00.000ZUAE Consumer Confidence Peaks: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="1" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>2H 2010</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>1H 2010</b></th> </tr><tr><th>Egypt</th> <td>54.1</td> <td>66.6</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> </tr><tr><th>Kuwait</th> <td>96.8</td> <td>95.8</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> </tr><tr><th>Lebanon</th> <td>26.9</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> </tr><tr><th>Oman</th> <td>87.1</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><th>Qatar</th> <td>96.4</td> <td>96.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> </tr><tr><th>Saudi Arabia</th> <td>93.3</td> <td>95.2</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> </tr><tr><th>U.A.E.</th> <td>94.7</td> <td>91.4</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> </tr><tr><th>Total Middle East</th> <td><b>78.5</b></td> <td><b>81.1</b></td> <td><b>83.5</b></td> <td><b>85.7</b></td> <td><b>82.8</b></td> <td><b>72.4</b></td> <td><b>70.1</b></td> <td><b>74.1</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence<br> </i></p> <p></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/uae-consumer-confidence-peaks--mastercard-index2013-08-26T16:00:00.000Z2013-08-26T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Highest in Kuwait: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description">MARKETS</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2010</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2010</th> </tr><tr><th>Egypt</th> <td>54.1</td> <td>66.6</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> </tr><tr><th>Kuwait</th> <td>96.8</td> <td>95.8</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> </tr><tr><th>Lebanon</th> <td>26.9</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> </tr><tr><th>Oman</th> <td>87.1</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><th>Qatar</th> <td>96.4</td> <td>96.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> </tr><tr><th>Saudi Arabia</th> <td>93.3</td> <td>95.2</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> </tr><tr><th>U.A.E.</th> <td>94.7</td> <td>91.4</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> </tr><tr><th>Total Middle East</th> <td><b>78.5</b></td> <td><b>81.1</b></td> <td><b>83.5</b></td> <td><b>85.7</b></td> <td><b>82.8</b></td> <td><b>72.4</b></td> <td><b>70.1</b></td> <td><b>74.1</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contact:<p>Jandré Nieuwoudt<br> GolinHarris<br> Dubai<br> +971 4 3323308<br> <a href="mailto:jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com">jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com</a></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/consumer-confidence-highest-in-kuwait--mastercard-index-2013-08-26T16:00:00.000Z2013-08-26T16:00:00.000ZKiwi confidence levels down, but income prospects looking bright Amy O’Rourke, Alexandria SorensenMasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence New Zealand<table width="419" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>Component </b></th> <th colspan="2" class="table-description"><b>Current Status </b></th> <th colspan="2" class="table-description"><b>Change from last half </b></th> </tr><tr><td>Overall MWICC</td> <td>42.7</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-8.3</td> <td>Some deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td>Employment</td> <td>34.5</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-13.7</td> <td>Significant deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td>Economy</td> <td>41.3</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-5.0</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td>Regular income</td> <td>70.9</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>2.3</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td>Stock market</td> <td>41.8</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-9.9</td> <td>Some deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td>Quality of life</td> <td>24.8</td> <td>Very pessimistic</td> <td>-15.4</td> <td>Significant deterioration</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between 7 November 2012 and 23 December 2012 on 11,339 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 25 countries. This is the 40th survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993.</p> <p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6 month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Media Contacts<p>Amy O’Rourke<br> Acumen Republic for MasterCard<br> +64 9 354 0584<br> +64 27 2958 332&nbsp;<br> <a href="mailto:aorourke@acumenrepublic.com">aorourke@acumenrepublic.com</a>&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>Alexandria Sorensen<br> Acumen Republic for MasterCard<br> +64 4 494 5171<br> +64 27 469 1045<br> <a href="mailto:asorensen@acumenrepublic.com">asorensen@acumenrepublic.com</a></p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/kiwi-confidence-levels-down--but-income-prospects-looking-bright2013-02-13T16:00:00.000Z2013-02-13T16:00:00.000ZIndonesia, Philippines Lead Asia/Pacific for Consumer Confidence: MasterCard Index Georgette Tan, Robert O’BrienMasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence 2H 2012<p><b>Methodology</b></p> <p>Respondents were asked 5 questions pertaining to their 6-month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in 5 component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.<br> </p> About the MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty five markets now participate in the survey: Australia, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from 7 November to 23 December 2012. A total of 11,339 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 25 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers’ thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/#%21/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contacts<p>Georgette Tan,<br> MasterCard Worldwide,&nbsp;<br> <a href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com">georgette_tan@mastercard.com</a>,<br> +65 6390 5971</p> <p>Robert O’Brien,<br> Weber Shandwick,&nbsp;<br> <a href="mailto:robrien@webershandwick.com">robrien@webershandwick.com</a>,<br> +65 6825 8064</p> Launched in 1993, the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence has proven to be an excellent barometer of general consumer pulse in Asia/Pacific. The twice annual survey analyzes prevailing consumer perceptions of economic conditions for the next six-months.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/indonesia--philippines-lead-asia-pacific-for-consumer-confidence2013-02-06T16:00:00.000Z2013-02-06T16:00:00.000ZMost Consumers in Asia Pacific Feeling More Confident and Optimistic Key Takeaways (Overall) <ol> <li>Collectively, the<b> </b>Asia Pacific markets are optimistic<b> – recording the highest consumer confidence score in more than 10 years. </b>The region is up 6.9 Index points to 68.3 Index points in H1 2014 from 61.5 Index points in H2 2013.</li> <li><b>Compared to 6 months ago, twelve out of the 16 Asia Pacific markets </b>surveyed recorded both positive sentiment and experienced either some or significant improvement in consumer confidence<b>. </b>Four markets moved above the 50 point neutral mark in this survey, leaving only Australia and South Korea as the only markets out of the 16 to remain below the 50 point neutral mark.</li> <li><b>Asia Pacific markets showed increases in each of the key economic indicators:&nbsp; </b>economy (67.1 Index points in H1 2014 from 59.3 Index points in H2 2013), employment (69.2 from 62.2 Index points), regular income prospect (77.5 from 72.1 Index points), stock market (65.7 from 57.4 Index points), and quality of life (62.2 from 56.3 Index points).</li> </ol> Key Takeaways (by Country) <ul> <li><b>Bangladesh recorded the biggest uptick in consumer confidence, </b>jumping a whopping 25.9 points (from 40.5 Index points in H2 2013 to 66.4 Index points in H1 2014).</li> <li><b>Taiwan’s consumer confidence also grew by a large percentage, </b>up 24.6 points (from 33.0 Index points in H2 2013 to 57.6 Index points in H1 2014).</li> <li>Other significant, double-digit improvements in consumer confidence were recorded <b>by Thailand</b> up 14.6 Index points (from 72.0 Index points in H2 2013 to 86.6 Index points in H1 2014); <b>Singapore</b> up 13.2 Index points (from 47.4 Index points in H2 2013 to 60.6 Index points in H1 2014); <b>Indonesia</b> up 11.3 Index points (from 82.8 Index points in H2 2013 to 94.0 Index points in H1 2014); and <b>New Zealand</b> up 10.8 Index points (from 55.0 Index points in H2 2013 to 65.8 Index points in H1 2014).</li> <li><b>Myanmar, Indonesia and India</b> recorded the<b> </b>Asia Pacific region’s<b> highest consumer confidence scores</b>, with 94.1 Index points, 94.0 Index points and 89.1 Index points, respectively.M</li> <li>eanwhile,<b> Australia recorded the largest dip in consumer confidence, </b>down 12 Index points to 37.2 Index points in H1 2014 from 49.2 in H2 2013.</li> </ul> <p>“Consumer confidence across the Asia Pacific region has reached its highest level in more than 10 years. Markets like Bangladesh and Taiwan are showing strong increases in consumer sentiment, bolstered by key influences such as a perception of better employment prospects and of an improving economy,” said <b>Pierre Burret</b>, Head of Delivery, Quality &amp; Resource Management for Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East &amp; Africa, MasterCard Advisors.</p> <p>&quot;The region’s overall optimism for the future is an encouraging sign, and demonstrates the importance of continuing to innovate with partners in emerging markets like Myanmar, India and Indonesia, in efforts to drive economic growth,” he added<b>.</b></p> <p>The Index is based on a survey conducted between July 2014 and August 2014 on 12,574 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries across Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa. This is the 43rd survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993.</p> Methodology<p><b>R</b>espondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons</p> About MasterCard<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>, is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> The Index is based on a survey conducted between July 2014 and August 2014 on 12,574 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries across Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa. Consumers in Asia Pacific largely remain optimistic on their economic outlook despite continued uncertainty in the global economy with the exception of Australia, according to the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence, released today.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/most-consumers-in-asia-pacific-feeling-more-confident-and-optimi2014-10-13T16:00:00.000Z2014-10-13T16:00:00.000ZSouth African Consumer Confidence Improves – MasterCard Index MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>, <a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons</p> About MasterCard<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>, is a global payments and technology company. It operates the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>, </b>join the discussion on the <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/"><b>news</b></a>.</p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/south-african-consumer-confidence-improves2013-09-15T16:00:00.000Z2013-09-15T16:00:00.000ZYouth in Asia/Pacific Optimistic about Short-Term Outlook: MasterCard Index Georgette Tan, MasterCard, georgette_tan@mastercard.com, +65 6390 5971About the MasterCard Index™ of Youth Confidence<p>The MasterCard Youth Confidence Index is a new initiative by MasterCard to measure the short-term outlook and confidence levels amongst youth (18-30 years) in the Asia/Pacific region. Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Present Quality of Life and Anticipated Quality of Life in 5 years. The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead.</p> <p></p> <p>Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary. The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.<i> The Index and its accompanying reports do not represent MasterCard’s financial performance.</i></p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/index_of_womens_advancement/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">Online Shopping</a>, Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2012-2/" target="_blank">Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/2012" target="_blank">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey_on_consumer_purchasing_priorities/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">Consumer Purchasing Priorities</a> (covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p></p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> About MasterCard <p><b><u><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a></u></b>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a></u></b>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<b><u><a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a></u>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a></u></b>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank">subscribe</a></u></b>&nbsp;for the latest news on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>Engagement Bureau</b></a>.</p> The MasterCard Youth Confidence Index measures the short-term outlook and confidence levels amongst youth (18-30 years) in the Asia/Pacific region. http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/youth-in-asia-pacific-optimistic-about-short-term-outlook--maste2014-01-20T16:00:00.000Z2014-01-20T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Remains Low in Lebanon despite Slight Improvement: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results: <table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description">MARKETS</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2010</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2010</th> </tr><tr><th>Egypt</th> <td>54.1</td> <td>66.6</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> </tr><tr><th>Kuwait</th> <td>96.8</td> <td>95.8</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> </tr><tr><th>Lebanon</th> <td>26.9</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> </tr><tr><th>Oman</th> <td>87.1</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><th>Qatar</th> <td>96.4</td> <td>96.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> </tr><tr><th>Saudi Arabia</th> <td>93.3</td> <td>95.2</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> </tr><tr><th>U.A.E.</th> <td>94.7</td> <td>91.4</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> </tr><tr><th>Total Middle East</th> <td><b>78.5</b></td> <td><b>81.1</b></td> <td><b>83.5</b></td> <td><b>85.7</b></td> <td><b>82.8</b></td> <td><b>72.4</b></td> <td><b>70.1</b></td> <td><b>74.1</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i><b>&nbsp;</b></p> Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.&nbsp;</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.&nbsp;</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market. &nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com/"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contact<p>Jandré Nieuwoudt<br> GolinHarris<br> Dubai<br> +971 4 3323308<br> <a href="mailto:jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com">jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com</a></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/consumer-confidence-remains-low-in-lebanon-despite-slight-improv2013-08-26T16:00:00.000Z2013-08-26T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Increases in Morocco: MasterCard Index METHODOLOGY<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> ABOUT THE MASTERCARD INDEX™ OF CONSUMER CONFIDENCE<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MASTERCARD AND ITS SUITE OF RESEARCH PROPERTIES<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contact<p>Jandré Nieuwoudt<br> GolinHarris<br> Dubai<br> +971 4 3323308<br> <a href="mailto:jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com">jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com</a></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/consumer-confidence-increases-in-morocco--mastercard-index2013-08-26T16:00:00.000Z2013-08-26T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Remains High in Oman: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description">MARKETS</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2010</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2010</th> </tr><tr><th>Egypt</th> <td>54.1</td> <td>66.6</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> </tr><tr><th>Kuwait</th> <td>96.8</td> <td>95.8</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> </tr><tr><th>Lebanon</th> <td>26.9</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> </tr><tr><th>Oman</th> <td>87.1</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><th>Qatar</th> <td>96.4</td> <td>96.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> </tr><tr><th>Saudi Arabia</th> <td>93.3</td> <td>95.2</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> </tr><tr><th>U.A.E.</th> <td>94.7</td> <td>91.4</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> </tr><tr><th>Total Middle East</th> <td><b>78.5</b></td> <td><b>81.1</b></td> <td><b>83.5</b></td> <td><b>85.7</b></td> <td><b>82.8</b></td> <td><b>72.4</b></td> <td><b>70.1</b></td> <td><b>74.1</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i><b>&nbsp;</b></p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004.</p> <p>MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard<p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com/"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contact<p>Jandré Nieuwoudt<br> GolinHarris<br> Dubai<br> +971 4 3323308<br> <a href="mailto:jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com">jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com</a></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/consumer-confidence-remains-high-in-oman--mastercard-index-2013-08-26T16:00:00.000Z2013-08-26T16:00:00.000ZConsumers 'Extremely Optimistic' in Qatar: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="1" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description">MARKETS</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2013</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2012</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2011</th> <th class="table-description">2H 2010</th> <th class="table-description">1H 2010</th> </tr><tr><th>Egypt</th> <td>54.1</td> <td>66.6</td> <td>90.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>75.4</td> <td>47.7</td> <td>45.5</td> <td>59.5</td> </tr><tr><th>Kuwait</th> <td>96.8</td> <td>95.8</td> <td>84.7</td> <td>88.3</td> <td>90.6</td> <td>80.4</td> <td>96.9</td> <td>70.9</td> </tr><tr><th>Lebanon</th> <td>26.9</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>44.3</td> <td>70.5</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>54.3</td> <td>44.6</td> <td>55.4</td> </tr><tr><th>Oman</th> <td>87.1</td> <td>95.6</td> <td>91.5</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>98.8</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> <td>-</td> </tr><tr><th>Qatar</th> <td>96.4</td> <td>96.5</td> <td>96.6</td> <td>93.6</td> <td>99.7</td> <td>83.6</td> <td>65.8</td> <td>89.2</td> </tr><tr><th>Saudi Arabia</th> <td>93.3</td> <td>95.2</td> <td>90.9</td> <td>83.9</td> <td>98.4</td> <td>95.1</td> <td>85.0</td> <td>83.2</td> </tr><tr><th>U.A.E.</th> <td>94.7</td> <td>91.4</td> <td>86.0</td> <td>82.1</td> <td>92.9</td> <td>73.6</td> <td>82.4</td> <td>86.1</td> </tr><tr><th>Total Middle East</th> <td><b>78.5</b></td> <td><b>81.1</b></td> <td><b>83.5</b></td> <td><b>85.7</b></td> <td><b>82.8</b></td> <td><b>72.4</b></td> <td><b>70.1</b></td> <td><b>74.1</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><b><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i>&nbsp;</b></p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.&nbsp;</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market. &nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the&nbsp;MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping,&nbsp;Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending&nbsp;and a series on&nbsp;Consumer Purchasing Priorities&nbsp;(covering&nbsp;Travel,&nbsp;Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education,&nbsp;Money Management,&nbsp;Luxury&nbsp;and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank"><b>Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</b></a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard Worldwide and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a><b>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a>&nbsp;for the latest&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Contact<p>Jandré Nieuwoudt<br> GolinHarris<br> Dubai<br> +971 4 3323308<br> <a href="mailto:jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com">jnieuwoudt@golinharris.com</a></p> The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is based on a survey conducted between April 2013 and May 2013 on 12,205 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 27 countries. This is the 41st survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993, and covers 3 key regions: Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2013/consumers-_extremely-optimistic-in-qatar--mastercard-index2013-08-26T16:00:00.000Z2013-08-26T16:00:00.000ZConsumers ‘Extremely Optimistic’ in Oman: MasterCard Middle East Consumer Confidence Results:<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2014</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2011</b></th> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Egypt</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">78.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">66.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">75.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">47.7</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Kuwait</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">92.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.8</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">84.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">80.4</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Lebanon</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">12.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">26.9</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">26.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">44.3</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">70.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">24.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.3</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Oman</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">94.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">87.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">91.5</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">-</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Qatar</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">97.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.4</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">96.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.6</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">99.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">83.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Saudi Arabia</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">96.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">93.3</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.9</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">83.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">95.1</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">U.A.E.</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">88.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">94.7</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">91.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">86.0</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">82.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">92.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">73.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>Total Middle East</b></th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;"><b>79.9</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>78.5</b></td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;"><b>81.1</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>83.5</b></td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;"><b>85.7</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>82.8</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>72.4</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i></p> Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/index_of_womens_advancement/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/2012" target="_blank">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey_on_consumer_purchasing_priorities/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">Consumer Purchasing Priorities</a> (covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.&nbsp;</p> About MasterCard:<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a><u> </u>(NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a>, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardMEA" target="_blank">@MasterCardMEA</a> join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank">Cashless Conversations Blog</a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank">subscribe</a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">news</a>.</p> MasterCard has revealed the results of its latest IndexTM of Consumer Confidence, which indicates that consumer sentiment in Oman has recorded a remarkable increase, with a score of 94.6.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/consumers-extremely-optimistic-in-oman2014-11-09T16:00:00.000Z2014-11-09T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Remains High in Kuwait: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results:<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2014</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2011</b></th> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Egypt</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">78.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">66.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">75.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">47.7</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Kuwait</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">92.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.8</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">84.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">80.4</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Lebanon</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">12.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">26.9</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">26.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">44.3</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">70.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">24.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.3</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Oman</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">94.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">87.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">91.5</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">-</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Qatar</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">97.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.4</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">96.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.6</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">99.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">83.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Saudi Arabia</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">96.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">93.3</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.9</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">83.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">95.1</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">U.A.E.</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">88.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">94.7</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">91.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">86.0</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">82.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">92.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">73.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>Total Middle East</b></th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;"><b>79.9</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>78.5</b></td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;"><b>81.1</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>83.5</b></td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;"><b>85.7</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>82.8</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>72.4</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i></p> Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p></p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p></p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a>&nbsp;and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>,<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p></p> About MasterCard<p><b><u><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a></u></b>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a></u></b>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<b><u><a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a></u>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a></u></b>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank">subscribe</a></u></b>&nbsp;for the latest news on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>Engagement Bureau</b></a>.</p> MasterCard has revealed the results of its latest Consumer Confidence IndexTM, which indicates that consumer sentiment in Kuwait remains high, with a score of 92.6.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/consumer-confidence-remains-high-in-kuwait2014-11-09T16:00:00.000Z2014-11-09T16:00:00.000ZConsumers ‘Extremely Optimistic’ in Egypt: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results: <table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2014</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2011</b></th> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Egypt</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">78.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">66.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">75.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">47.7</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Kuwait</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">92.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.8</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">84.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">80.4</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Lebanon</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">12.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">26.9</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">26.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">44.3</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">70.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">24.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.3</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Oman</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">94.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">87.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">91.5</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">-</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Qatar</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">97.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.4</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">96.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.6</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">99.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">83.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Saudi Arabia</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">96.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">93.3</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.9</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">83.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">95.1</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">U.A.E.</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">88.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">94.7</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">91.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">86.0</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">82.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">92.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">73.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>Total Middle East</b></th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;"><b>79.9</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>78.5</b></td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;"><b>81.1</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>83.5</b></td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;"><b>85.7</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>82.8</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>72.4</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i></p> Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p></p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a>&nbsp;and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>,<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> <p></p> About MasterCard<p><b><u><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a></u></b>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a></u></b>,<b>&nbsp;</b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<b><u><a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a></u>,&nbsp;</b>join the discussion on the&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/" target="_blank">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a></u></b>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<b><u><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank">subscribe</a></u></b>&nbsp;for the latest news on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>Engagement Bureau</b></a>.</p> MasterCard has revealed the results of its latest Consumer Confidence IndexTM, which indicates that consumer sentiment in Egypt is very high at 78.6.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/consumers-extremely-optimistic-in-egypt2014-11-09T16:00:00.000Z2014-11-09T16:00:00.000ZSlight Improvement in South African Consumer Confidence – MasterCard Index MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Worldwide Index suite in Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Worldwide Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the MasterCard Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement, Online Shopping, Index of Financial Literacy, and the Index of Global Destination Cities. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including Ethical Spending and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Middle East and Africa region. The company has produced over 80 Insights reports since 2004.</p> About MasterCard<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>MasterCard</b></a> (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com" target="_blank"><b>www.mastercard.com</b></a>,<b> </b>is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate&nbsp;the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MasterCardNews</b></a> and <b><a href="http://www.twitter.com/MasterCardMEA" target="_blank">@MasterCardMEA</a><b>, </b></b>join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog/"><b>Cashless Conversations Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe/" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/" target="_blank"><b>news</b></a>.</p> Consumer Confidence is based on a forward-looking survey which measures consumer sentiment and expectations of the country’s performance using five economic indicators: Economy, Employment, Stock Market, Regular Income and Quality of Life.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/slight-improvement-in-south-african-consumer-confidence2014-10-28T16:00:00.000Z2014-10-28T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Dips in Morocco: MasterCard Index Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p></p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p></p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/index_of_womens_advancement/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/2012" target="_blank">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey_on_consumer_purchasing_priorities/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">Consumer Purchasing Priorities</a> (covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p><br> MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> About MasterCard<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (NSYE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a> is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter: <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardMEA" target="_blank">@MasterCardMEA</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a>, join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/blog" target="_blank">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">subscribe</a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">MEA Engagement Bureau</a>.&nbsp;</p> MasterCard has revealed the results of its latest Consumer Confidence IndexTM, which indicates that Consumer Confidence in Morocco has dipped as compared to last year with a score of 79.6.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/consumer-confidence-dips-in-morocco2014-11-09T16:00:00.000Z2014-11-09T16:00:00.000ZConsumers ‘Extremely Optimistic’ in Saudi Arabia: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results: <table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2014</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2011</b></th> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Egypt</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">78.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">66.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">75.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">47.7</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Kuwait</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">92.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.8</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">84.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">80.4</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Lebanon</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">12.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">26.9</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">26.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">44.3</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">70.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">24.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.3</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Oman</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">94.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">87.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">91.5</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">-</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Qatar</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">97.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.4</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">96.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.6</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">99.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">83.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Saudi Arabia</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">96.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">93.3</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.9</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">83.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">95.1</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">U.A.E.</th> <td width="74" valign="top" style="text-align: right;">88.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">94.7</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">91.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">86.0</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">82.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">92.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">73.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>Total Middle East</b></th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;"><b>79.9</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>78.5</b></td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;"><b>81.1</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>83.5</b></td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;"><b>85.7</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>82.8</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>72.4</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i></p> Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p></p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p></p> <p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/index_of_womens_advancement/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/2012" target="_blank">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey_on_consumer_purchasing_priorities/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">Consumer Purchasing Priorities</a> (covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.&nbsp;</p> About MasterCard<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (NSYE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a> is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter: <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardMEA" target="_blank">@MasterCardMEA</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a>, join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/blog" target="_blank">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">subscribe</a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">MEA Engagement Bureau</a>.&nbsp;</p> MasterCard has revealed the results of its latest Consumer Confidence IndexTM, which indicates that consumer sentiment in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is very high at a score of 96.3.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/consumers-extremely-optimistic-in-saudi-arabia2014-11-09T16:00:00.000Z2014-11-09T16:00:00.000ZUAE Consumers Remain Optimistic: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results: <table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description" valign="top" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2014</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2011</b></th> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Egypt</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">78.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">66.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">75.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">47.7</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Kuwait</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">92.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.8</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">84.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">80.4</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Lebanon</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">12.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">26.9</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">26.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">44.3</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">70.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">24.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.3</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Oman</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">94.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">87.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">91.5</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">-</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Qatar</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">97.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.4</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">96.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.6</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">99.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">83.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Saudi Arabia</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">96.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">93.3</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.9</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">83.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">95.1</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">U.A.E.</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">88.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">94.7</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">91.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">86.0</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">82.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">92.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">73.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>Total Middle East</b></th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;"><b>79.9</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>78.5</b></td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;"><b>81.1</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>83.5</b></td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;"><b>85.7</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>82.8</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>72.4</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i></p> Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p></p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p></p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the <a href="http://masterintelligence.com/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://masterintelligence.com/" target="_blank">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, <a href="http://masterintelligence.com/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy</a>, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://masterintelligence.com/" target="_blank">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on <a href="http://masterintelligence.com/" target="_blank">Consumer Purchasing Priorities</a> (covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.&nbsp;</p> About MasterCard<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (NSYE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a> is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter: <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardMEA" target="_blank">@MasterCardMEA</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a>, join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/blog" target="_blank">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">subscribe</a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">MEA Engagement Bureau</a>.&nbsp;</p> MasterCard has revealed the results of its latest Consumer Confidence IndexTM, which indicates that consumer sentiment in the UAE remains steady and optimistic with a score of 88.7. http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/uae-consumers-remain-optimistic2014-11-09T16:00:00.000Z2014-11-09T16:00:00.000ZConsumer Confidence Peaks in Qatar: MasterCard Index Middle East Consumer Confidence Results:<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>MARKETS</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2014</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2013</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2012</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>2H 2011</b></th> <th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>1H 2011</b></th> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Egypt</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">78.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">66.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">75.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">47.7</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Kuwait</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">92.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.8</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">84.7</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">88.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">80.4</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Lebanon</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">12.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">26.9</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">26.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">44.3</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">70.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">24.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">54.3</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Oman</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">94.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">87.1</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">91.5</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.8</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">-</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Qatar</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">97.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.4</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">96.5</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">96.6</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">93.6</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">99.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">83.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">Saudi Arabia</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">96.3</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">93.3</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">95.2</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">90.9</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">83.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">98.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">95.1</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;">U.A.E.</th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;">88.7</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">94.7</td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;">91.4</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">86.0</td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;">82.1</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">92.9</td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;">73.6</td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description" style="text-align: center;"><b>Total Middle East</b></th> <td width="74" style="text-align: right;"><b>79.9</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>78.5</b></td> <td width="66" style="text-align: right;"><b>81.1</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>83.5</b></td> <td width="78" style="text-align: right;"><b>85.7</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>82.8</b></td> <td width="72" style="text-align: right;"><b>72.4</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p><i>Source: MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</i></p> Methodology:<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six month outlook on the economy, employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were averaged to form the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence (MWICC) score. The MWICC Index score and the five component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence:<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p></p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p></p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia/Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam. The latest MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence survey was conducted from April to May 2013. A total of 12,205 qualified respondents were surveyed in the 27 markets with the sample being representative of the middle and upper income groups in each market.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/index_of_womens_advancement/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the Indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey-online_shopping_and_ethical_spending/asia_pacific/2012" target="_blank">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/view_report/survey_on_consumer_purchasing_priorities/asia_pacific/default" target="_blank">Consumer Purchasing Priorities</a> (covering Travel, Dining &amp; Entertainment, Education, Money Management, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/" target="_blank">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.&nbsp;</p> About MasterCard<p><a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">MasterCard</a> (NSYE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a> is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter: <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardMEA" target="_blank">@MasterCardMEA</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a>, join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/blog" target="_blank">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">subscribe</a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/mea/" target="_blank">MEA Engagement Bureau</a>.&nbsp;</p> MasterCard has revealed the results of its latest Consumer Confidence IndexTM, which indicates that consumer sentiment in Qatar is now highest in Middle East with a peak score of 97.2.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2014/consumer-confidence-peaks-in-qatar2014-11-09T16:00:00.000Z2014-11-09T16:00:00.000ZConsumer confidence in Asia Pacific inches down, as discordant emerging markets consumers remain optimistic Georgette TanKey Takeaways (Overall)<p><a href="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/consumer-confidence-h2-2014.jpg" target="_blank"><img width="337" height="440" src="/content/dam/intelligence/content-assets/consumer-confidence-h2-2014.jpg"></a></p> <p></p> <ul> <li><b>The Asia Pacific markets are optimistic overall </b>despite a decrease of 2.9 Index points to 65.5 Index points in H2 2014, from 68.3 Index points in H1 2014.</li> <li><b>Compared to H1 2014, only the Philippines (up 7.7 Index points) and Bangladesh (up 16.9 Index points) out of the 16 Asia Pacific markets</b> surveyed recorded a greater than 5 Index point improvement in consumer confidence. 10 out of 16 Asia Pacific markets remained stable with either muted improvements or declines</li> <li><b>There were declines across all five key economic indicators for Asia Pacific: </b>economy (62.7 Index points in H2 2014 from 67.1 Index points in H1 2014), employment (65.8 from 69.2 Index points), regular income prospect (75.5 from 77.5 Index points), stock market (61.5 from 65.7 Index points), and quality of life (61.9 from 62.2 Index points).</li> </ul> <p></p> Key Takeaways (by Country) <ul> <li><b>Bangladesh recorded the single largest improvement in Asia Pacific</b>, moving from optimistic to very optimistic territory at 83.3 Index points, up 16.9 Index points. It is the only market that saw a double-digit rise in consumer sentiment.</li> <li><b>Myanmar, India and Indonesia are the Asia Pacific region's most optimistic markets, </b>with 97.2 Index points, 91.6 Index points and 90.1 Index points, respectively.</li> <li><b>Within Southeast Asia, consumer confidence rose in the Philippines</b> by 7.7 Index points, pushing into optimistic territory (77.1 Index points), while <b>Malaysia saw a deterioration </b>in consumer confidence, down 11.5 Index points to 49.9 Index points in H2 2014, sliding below the 50 point neutral mark for the first time since the financial crisis low in H1 2009.</li> <li><b>Vietnam (85.3 Index points) and Thailand (83.6 Index points) remain very optimistic</b> and Singapore remains optimistic (60.9 Index points).</li> <li>While consumer confidence in China (up 2.7 Index points to 85.3 Index points in H2 2014) and South Korea (up 1.7 Index points to 43.6 Index points) stayed stable with muted increases, their <b>Northeast Asian counterparts posted the sharpest declines in consumer confidence, led by Taiwan (down 23.8 Index points to 33.8 Index points), Japan (down 17.6 Index points to 34.2 Index points) and Hong Kong (down 13.5 Index points to 40.9 Index points)</b>. All three markets plunged below the 50 point neutral mark from the previous survey.</li> <li><b>Additional declines were recorded in Australia </b>(down 3.2 Index points to 34.1 Index points in H2 2014) keeping it in pessimistic territory, while <b>New Zealand inched closer to the 50 point neutral mark</b> after falling 9.4 Index points to 56.4 Index points. Australia's score is the lowest since the financial crisis low in H1 2009.</li> </ul> <p>&quot;The slight drop in Asia Pacific's consumer confidence reflects an outlook of cautious optimism. Consumers across the region are holding their breath for signs of sustained economic growth and opportunity. Emerging markets Myanmar, India and Indonesia are the most optimistic because of either positive anticipation for a brighter future or excitement around their respective newly-minted governments. Conversely, the developed markets of Northeast Asia, namely Taiwan, Japan and Hong Kong were much less optimistic in their outlook. In these markets, the wanted signs of long-term growth and opportunity are blocked by Hong Kong's recent political crisis and Japan's weakening yen,” said <b>Pierre Burret</b>, Head of Delivery, Quality &amp; Resource Management for Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East &amp; Africa, MasterCard Advisors.</p> <p>The Index is based on a survey conducted between October 2014 and November 2014 on 8,235 respondents aged 18 – 64 in 16 countries across Asia Pacific. This is the 44th survey of Consumer Confidence conducted since 1993.</p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa.</p> <p>The MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey comprising the Asia Pacific markets began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Markets from the Middle East and Africa were included in the Index from 2004. Twenty seven markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco, Myanmar, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, South Africa, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam.</p> <p>The Index is calculated based with zero as the most pessimistic, 100 as most optimistic and 50 as neutral.&nbsp; Five economic factors are measured: Employment, the Economy, Regular Income, Stock Market and Quality of Life. The responses are consumers' thoughts on the six months ahead. Data collection was via internet surveys and face to face interviews, with the questionnaire translated to the local language wherever appropriate and necessary.&nbsp; The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus four to five percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.</p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa includes the long-running <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">MasterCard Survey on Online Shopping</a>, MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy, and the <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> <p>MasterCard also regularly releases Insights reports providing analysis of business dynamics, financial policies and regulatory activities in the Asia/Pacific, Middle East and Africa region. Over 80 Insights reports have been produced since 2004. MasterCard has also released a series of four books on Asian consumer insights, authored by <a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/people/dyuwa/">Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong</a>, Global Economic Advisor for MasterCard and published by John Wiley &amp; Sons.</p> About MasterCard <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html">MasterCard</a>&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.mastercard.com/">www.mastercard.com</a>,&nbsp;is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardAP">@MasterCardAP</a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews">@MasterCardNews</a>,&nbsp;join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/blog">Cashless Pioneers Blog</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/subscribe/">subscribe</a>&nbsp;for the latest news on the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific">Engagement Bureau</a>.</p> Contacts<p><b>Georgette Tan</b><br> MasterCard,<br> <a href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com">georgette_tan@mastercard.com</a>,<br> +65 6390 5971</p> <p><b>Samantha Yong<br> </b>Weber Shandwick, <br> <a href="mailto:samyong@webershandwick.com">samyong@webershandwick.com</a>,<br> +65 6825 8053</p> Consumers in Asia Pacific’s emerging markets remain optimistic despite a slight decline in overall consumer confidence for the region, according to the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence, released today. This decrease comes after the region recorded the highest consumer confidence score in more than 10 years in the previous survey (H1 2014).http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2015/consumer-confidence-in-asia-pacific-inches-down2015-01-14T16:00:00.000Z2015-01-14T16:00:00.000ZHigh Levels of Consumer Optimism Beginning to Recede in Asia Pacific Georgette TanKey APAC findings<ul> <li>Collectively, <b>Asia Pacific markets remain optimistic</b> – levels of optimism remain stable at 66.1 Index points in H1 2015 compared to 68.3 Index points in H1 2014. This stability reflects the fact that the most pessimistic markets are showing signs of improvement while the most optimistic are showing decreased confidence.</li> <li>People in Indonesia, Thailand and Myanmar remain generally optimistic <b>but consumers have shown significant deterioration</b> in their confidence from very high levels 6 months ago.</li> <li>While optimism remains high overall, there is still <b>significant variation between markets </b>in the region. Australia is the only pessimistic market at 39.5 Index points, while India, with 93.1 Index points is the only market in Asia Pacific in which consumers are ‘extremely optimistic’ about economic prospects over the next six months.</li> <li><b>Consumer confidence in China and Hong Kong were shown to be stable</b>, remaining optimistic. However, it is very important to note that the survey was conducted between May and June, before the fall in the Chinese stock market. There was no indication that confidence in the stock market would fall, and in the survey, the local stock market component is in optimistic territory at 81.3 Index points for China and 80 Index points for Hong Kong.</li> <li>Meanwhile <b>Australia, Taiwan, and Japan showed improvement</b> in consumer confidence. However they started off at either a pessimistic or neutral base.&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p></p> Additional country-level detail<ul> <li><b>Indonesia</b> (64.3) showed the greatest decline in confidence levels of all the markets surveyed with a 25.8 point drop led by large decreases in confidence in the economy (-31.6) and the stock market (-29.7). Bank Indonesia’s own consumer confidence index also shows falling numbers due to shrinking job availability as well as declining income and business activity.</li> <li>Consumer Confidence in <b>Thailand</b> (72.8) showed significant deterioration with a 10.9 point decrease. The outlook on the economy (-15.3) and employment (-12.5) contributed most to the drop.</li> <li><b>Myanmar’s</b> (81.6) consumer confidence posted a 15.6 point decrease moving it out of the 94+ (extremely optimistic) territory for the first time since MasterCard started surveying the country in 2013. The decrease was led by declining optimism regarding the local stock market (local property market for Myanmar) at -31.8 points.</li> <li>Consumer confidence in <b>Japan</b> showed extreme improvement, increasing by 22.3 points. Solid economic growth in the first quarter and increased tourism spending from overseas is supporting the retail sector. According to MasterCard’s latest <b>Global Destination Cities Index</b>, two of the fastest growing tourist destinations in the world since 2009 are in Japan, Osaka and Tokyo.</li> <li>In Southeast Asia, <b>Philippines</b> (81.4), <b>Singapore</b> (65.3) and <b>Vietnam</b> (86.9) remain stable with increases of less than 5 points. <b>Malaysia</b> (44.9) moves further into pessimistic territory with -5 points.</li> <li><b>Australia’s</b> one year slide has abated somewhat in this survey with an increase of 5.4 points, but at 39.5 it still remains below the 50 point neutrality mark. <b>New Zealand</b> remains stable at 57.7 (+1.3).</li> <li><b>India’s</b> consumer confidence remains in extremely optimistic territory (93.1, +1.5). It is the only market among the 17 that is above 90 points. <b>Bangladesh</b> falls 8 points to 75.3, driven downwards by a 21 point decline in confidence in the outlook of the local stock market (46.5). <b>Sri Lanka</b> makes its debut in the Index of Consumer Confidence at 67.5 putting it in optimistic territory.</li> </ul> <p><b>Matthew Driver, Group Executive, Global Products &amp; Solutions, Asia Pacific, MasterCard</b>, said: <i>“Consumer confidence is a more nuanced story for Asia Pacific in 2015 as economic uncertainty has begun to impact more developing markets. India is now the only market in Asia Pacific in which consumers are extremely optimistic about the future. The energy that Prime Minister Modi has brought to his reform agenda is being well received and having meaningful outcomes. Indeed the IMF is forecasting that India's economy will grow 7.5% this year, outpacing China for the first time since 1999. Chinese consumers also continued to be optimistic and with the survey period ahead of the recent stock market adjustments, were even more confident than in 2014. In comparison there was a significant moderation in consumer sentiment in a number of markets in Southeast Asia as the economic outlook has softened – specifically Indonesia, Myanmar and Thailand, all of whom recorded double digit declines in confidence. There were also further falls in Malaysia.”</i></p> <p></p> MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence 1H 2015<table> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"><b>H1 2015 Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"><b>Change from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Asia Pacific</b></td> <td><b>66.1</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>0.6</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Australia</b></td> <td><b>39.5</b></td> <td><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td><b>5.4</b></td> <td><b>Some Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>China</b></td> <td><b>85.9</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>0.6</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Hong Kong</b></td> <td><b>61.2</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>20.3</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>India</b></td> <td><b>93.1</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>1.5</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Indonesia</b></td> <td><b>64.3</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-25.8</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Japan</b></td> <td><b>56.6</b></td> <td><b>Neutral +</b></td> <td><b>22.3</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Korea</b></td> <td><b>40.0</b></td> <td><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td><b>-3.6</b></td> <td><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Malaysia</b></td> <td><b>44.9</b></td> <td><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td><b>-5.0</b></td> <td><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>New Zealand</b></td> <td><b>57.7</b></td> <td><b>Neutral +</b></td> <td><b>1.3</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Philippines</b></td> <td><b>81.4</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>4.3</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Singapore</b></td> <td><b>65.3</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>4.4</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Taiwan</b></td> <td><b>49.6</b></td> <td><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td><b>15.7</b></td> <td><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Thailand</b></td> <td><b>72.8</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-10.9</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Vietnam</b></td> <td><b>86.9</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>1.7</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Myanmar</b></td> <td><b>81.6</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-15.6</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Bangladesh</b></td> <td><b>75.3</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-8.0</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Sri Lanka</b></td> <td><b>67.5</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><br type="_moz"> </td> <td><br type="_moz"> </td> </tr></tbody></table> <p></p> <p><b>Index Score Current Status &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Change in Index Points from last half</b></p> <table> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"><b>Lower Range</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Upper Range</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</b></th> <th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Lower Range</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Upper Range</b></th> <th class="table-description"><b>Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>0</b></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Pessimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-100</b></td> <td><b>-20</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>25</b></td> <td><b>Very Pessimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-20</b></td> <td><b>-10</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>25</b></td> <td><b>40</b></td> <td><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-10</b></td> <td><b>-5</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>40</b></td> <td><b>50</b></td> <td><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-5</b></td> <td><b>0</b></td> <td><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>50</b></td> <td><b>60</b></td> <td><b>Neutral +</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>0</b></td> <td><b>5</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>60</b></td> <td><b>75</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>5</b></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>Some Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>75</b></td> <td><b>90</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>20</b></td> <td><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>90</b></td> <td><b>100</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>20</b></td> <td><b>100</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Improvement</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific.</p> <p>It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia Pacific includes the long-running <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy</a>, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">&nbsp;Online Shopping</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).&nbsp;</p> About MasterCard<p>MasterCard (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a>, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/mastercardap" target="_blank">@MasterCardAP</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a>, join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/blog/" target="_blank">Beyond the Transaction Blog</a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/subscribe" target="_blank">subscribe</a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">Engagement Bureau</a>.</p> Contacts<p><i>Georgette Tan, <br> MasterCard,&nbsp;<br> </i><a href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com" target="_blank"><i>georgette_tan@mastercard.com</i></a><i>, <br> +65 6390 5971</i></p> <p><i>Georgina Mallory, <br> Weber Shandwick,<br> </i><a href="mailto:gmallory@webershandwick.com" target="_blank"><i>gmallory@webershandwick.com</i></a><i>, <br> +65 6825 8026</i></p> <p></p> While consumers in Asia Pacific remain generally optimistic about the future, the level of optimism is beginning to recede in a number of markets, according to the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence, released today. The decline comes off the back of a ten year high in optimism levels in the second half of 2014 and reflects an increasingly uncertain economic outlook.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2015/high-levels-of-consumer-optimism-recede2015-07-28T16:00:00.000Z2015-07-28T16:00:00.000ZConsumer confidence in Asia Pacific falls as stock market sentiment weakens Key APAC findings<ul> <li>Overall, the&nbsp;<b>Asia Pacific markets saw a deterioration</b>&nbsp;<b>in confidence</b>, falling 6.4 points to 59.7 points in H2 2015 from 66.1 points in H1 2015. Eight of the 17 markets surveyed are now below the 50 point neutral mark compared to four in the previous survey conducted in H1 2015.</li> <li>There were&nbsp;<b>declines across all five key economic indicators for Asia Pacific</b>: stock market (-10.8 to 52.0), employment (-7.1 to 59.8), economy (-6.7 to 56.2), quality of life (-4.7 to 57.4) and regular income prospects (-2.9 to 72.9).</li> <li>People in the emerging markets of&nbsp;<b>Myanmar, Vietnam and India however are extremely optimistic about economic prospects</b>&nbsp;over the next six months, with Myanmar showing the biggest improvement.</li> <li><b>Compared to H1 2015, only Myanmar (+14.1), Indonesia (+12.2) and Vietnam (+7.3) out of the 16 Asia Pacific marketssurveyed recorded a greater than 5 point improvement</b>&nbsp;in consumer confidence.</li> <li>Declines were recorded in 12 out of 16 Asia Pacific markets, with&nbsp;<b>extreme deterioration in Sri Lanka (-25.2), Singapore (-20.9) and Taiwan (-20.6)</b>. The decreases recorded in&nbsp;<b>Korea</b>,&nbsp;<b>Malaysia</b>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<b>Taiwan</b>moved these markets from Neutral into pessimistic territory, while&nbsp;<b>Australia</b>&nbsp;– the only pessimistic market in the previous survey – moved from pessimistic to&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p></p> Country-level detail<ul> <li>Consumer confidence in both&nbsp;<b>China</b>&nbsp;(74.6) and&nbsp;<b>Hong</b>&nbsp;<b>Kong</b>&nbsp;(44.4) posted significant declines of 11.3 points and 16.8 points, respectively. Confidence in the stock market plummeted by 40.6 points in Hong Kong and had the most negative impact on the country’s overall score. Comparatively, China only suffered a 15.1 point drop in stock market sentiment despite the volatility in the Chinese stock market since the middle of 2015.</li> <li><b>Taiwan</b>&nbsp;(28.9), which showed extreme deterioration from six months ago, also saw a decrease in confidence in the stock market (-28.4) and employment (-24.2), and now has the lowest score in the region.</li> <li>While&nbsp;<b>Thailand’s</b>&nbsp;consumer confidence remains in optimistic territory (66.6) despite a drop of 6.1 points, sentiment is at its lowest level since late 2011.</li> <li><b>Singapore</b>&nbsp;(44.3) moved from optimistic into neutral territory after falling 20.9 points, led by extreme deterioration in stock market sentiment (-32.8), the economy (-26.9) and employment (-20.1).</li> <li><b>India’s</b>&nbsp;consumer confidence remains in extremely optimistic territory (90.2) with only a 2.9 point decline from the last survey.&nbsp;<b>Bangladesh</b>&nbsp;(67.3) saw some deterioration (-8.0) but its overall score remains optimistic.</li> <li><b>Sri</b>&nbsp;<b>Lanka</b>&nbsp;(42.2) showed the greatest decline in confidence levels of all markets surveyed with a 25.2 point drop, with all indicators suffering more than 20 point losses except for regular income which fell by a relatively smaller margin (-7). The depreciating rupee which has contributed to rising inflation has dampened the outlook in Sri Lanka.</li> <li><b>Australia</b>&nbsp;(42.4, +2.9) and&nbsp;<b>New</b>&nbsp;<b>Zealand</b>&nbsp;(52.0, -5.7) remain relatively stable although New Zealand suffered a deterioration of 17.5 points in their optimism levels for employment (41.8, -17.5).</li> </ul> <p></p> MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence Data – H2 2015<table> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>H2 2015 Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>Change from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Asia Pacific</b></td> <td><b>59.7</b></td> <td><b>Neutral +</b></td> <td><b>-6.4</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Australia</b></td> <td><b>42.4</b></td> <td><b>Neutral –</b></td> <td><b>2.9</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>China</b></td> <td><b>74.6</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-11.3</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Hong Kong</b></td> <td><b>44.4</b></td> <td><b>Neutral –</b></td> <td><b>-16.8</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>India</b></td> <td><b>90.2</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-2.9</b></td> <td><b>Stable –</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Indonesia</b></td> <td><b>76.5</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>12.2</b></td> <td><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Japan</b></td> <td><b>46.9</b></td> <td><b>Neutral –</b></td> <td><b>-9.7</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Korea</b></td> <td><b>33.8</b></td> <td><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td><b>-6.2</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Malaysia</b></td> <td><b>32.0</b></td> <td><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td><b>-13.0</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>New Zealand</b></td> <td><b>52.0</b></td> <td><b>Neutral +</b></td> <td><b>-5.7</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Philippines</b></td> <td><b>82.3</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>0.9</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Singapore</b></td> <td><b>44.3</b></td> <td><b>Neutral –</b></td> <td><b>-20.9</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Taiwan</b></td> <td><b>28.9</b></td> <td><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td><b>-20.6</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Thailand</b></td> <td><b>66.6</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-6.1</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Vietnam</b></td> <td><b>94.2</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>7.3</b></td> <td><b>Some Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Myanmar</b></td> <td><b>95.7</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>14.1</b></td> <td><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Bangladesh</b></td> <td><b>67.3</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>-8.0</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>Sri Lanka</b></td> <td><b>42.2</b></td> <td><b>Neutral –</b></td> <td><b>-25.2</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Deterioration</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <table> </table> <table> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description" colspan="3"><b>Index Score Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="3"><b>Change in Index Points from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Lower Range</b></td> <td><b>Upper Range</b></td> <td><b>Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</b></td> <td><b>Lower Range</b></td> <td><b>Upper Range</b></td> <td><b>Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>0</b></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Pessimistic</b></td> <td><b>-100</b></td> <td><b>-20</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>25</b></td> <td><b>Very Pessimistic</b></td> <td><b>-20</b></td> <td><b>-10</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>25</b></td> <td><b>40</b></td> <td><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td><b>-10</b></td> <td><b>-5</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>40</b></td> <td><b>50</b></td> <td><b>Neutral –</b></td> <td><b>-5</b></td> <td><b>0</b></td> <td><b>Stable –</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>50</b></td> <td><b>60</b></td> <td><b>Neutral +</b></td> <td><b>0</b></td> <td><b>5</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>60</b></td> <td><b>75</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>5</b></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>Some Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>75</b></td> <td><b>90</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>20</b></td> <td><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>90</b></td> <td><b>100</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td><b>20</b></td> <td><b>100</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Improvement</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <p></p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific.</p> <p>It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.</p> <p></p> MasterCard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The MasterCard Index suite in Asia Pacific includes the long-running&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Financial Literacy</a>, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">MasterCard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the indices, MasterCard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html" target="_blank">&nbsp;Online Shopping</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html" target="_blank">Ethical Spending</a>&nbsp;and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html" target="_blank">Travel</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html" target="_blank">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html" target="_blank">Education</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html" target="_blank">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> About MasterCard<p>MasterCard (NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a>, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/mastercardap" target="_blank">@MasterCardAP</a>&nbsp;and<a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews</a>, join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/blog/" target="_blank">Beyond the Transaction Blog</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/subscribe" target="_blank">subscribe</a>&nbsp;for the latest news on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">Engagement Bureau</a>.</p> Contacts<p><i>Georgette Tan,<br> </i><i>MasterCard,&nbsp;<br> </i><a href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com"><i>georgette_tan@mastercard.com</i></a><i>,<br> </i><i>+65 6390 5971</i></p> <p><i>Samantha Yong, <br> Weber Shandwick,</i><i>&nbsp;<br> </i><a href="mailto:samyong@webershandwick.com"><i>samyong@webershandwick.com</i></a><i>, <br> +65 6825 8053</i></p> <p><i></i><a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/press-releases/consumer-confidence-in-asia-pacific-falls-as-stock-market-sentiment-weakens/#_ftnref1"></a><a name="1"></a><i>[1]&nbsp;Myanmar uses the property market as a proxy for the stock market</i></p> <p></p> The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific. It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region. The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2016/consumer-confidence-falls2016-02-09T16:00:00.000Z2016-02-09T16:00:00.000ZMastercard Reports: ASEAN’s Confidence Boosted by Optimistic Youths Key Findings<ul> <li>According to findings from the Index, consumer confidence falls in correlation with an economy's development. Cambodia's consumers below 30 (95.4 points) are the most optimistic, followed by Myanmar's below 30s population (94.0 points) and Vietnam's (93.2 points). Conversely, consumers above 30 in Singapore (22.7 points) are the most pessimistic, along with Malaysia's above-30s demographic (26.2 points) and under-30s group (42.6 points).</li> <li>Age-related sentiment towards the future varies most strongly across ASEAN's more developed markets. The greatest disparities in optimism between people aged below 30 and above 30 are felt most keenly across Indonesia (73.3 points vs. 69.4 points), Singapore (47.3 points vs. 22.7 points) and Malaysia (42.6 points vs. 26.2 points).</li> <li>Although Philippines (91.2 points vs. 91.7 points) and Thailand (70.1 points vs. 63.2 points) are the only markets where confidence amongst the above-30s demographic exceed that of the below-30s', Thailand is the only market to shift from a neutral outlook into a positive one.</li> <li>Declines are recorded in the below 30s demographic across five out of eight ASEAN markets, with stable movements across Philippines (-3.7 points), Singapore (-1.2 points) and Vietnam (-3.4 points). Some deterioration is seen in Myanmar (-5.5 points), while significant deterioration is tracked in Malaysia (-10.3).</li> <li>While all ASEAN markets are most optimistic about regular income (87.7 points vs. 77.5 points), the Index also tracks the greatest disparity in sentiment amongst the age groups (10 points). Conversely, all age-groups are least confident about the stock market, with little disparity between sentiments (2.3 points).</li> </ul> <p></p> Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence Data - H2 2016<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr class="table-description"><th rowspan="2" style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Market</th> <th colspan="4" style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Below-30s</th> <th colspan="4" style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Above-30s</th> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Score</b></th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Sentiment</b></th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Movement</b></th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Status</b></th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Score</b></th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Sentiment</b></th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Movement</b></th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><b>Status</b></th> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Cambodia</th> <td style="text-align: center;">95.4</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optmistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">N/A</td> <td style="text-align: center;">N/A</td> <td style="text-align: center;">92.0</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">N/A</td> <td style="text-align: center;">N/A</td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Indonesia</th> <td style="text-align: center;">73.3</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">+7.1</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Some improvement</td> <td style="text-align: center;">69.4</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">+9.9</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Some improvement</td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Malaysia</th> <td style="text-align: center;">42.6</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Neutral-</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-10.1</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Some deterioration</td> <td style="text-align: center;">26.2</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Pessimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-10.3</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Some deterioration</td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Myanmar</th> <td style="text-align: center;">94.0</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-5.5</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Some deterioration</td> <td style="text-align: center;">92.0</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-7.9</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Some deterioration</td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Philippines</th> <td style="text-align: center;">91.2</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-3.7</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Stable-</td> <td style="text-align: center;">91.7</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-3.6</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Stable-</td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Singapore</th> <td style="text-align: center;">47.3</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Neutral</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-1.2</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Stable-</td> <td style="text-align: center;">22.7</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Very Pessimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-4.4</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Stable-</td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Thailand</th> <td style="text-align: center;">63.2</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">+8.6</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Some improvement</td> <td style="text-align: center;">70.1</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">+10.7</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Significant improvement</td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Vietnam</th> <td style="text-align: center;">93.2</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-3.4</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Stable-</td> <td style="text-align: center;">91.9</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Extremely Optimistic</td> <td style="text-align: center;">-1.4</td> <td style="text-align: center;">Stable+</td> </tr></tbody></table> <p></p> Methodology <p>Respondents across 17 markets were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific.</p> <p>It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.</p> <p></p> Mastercard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The Mastercard Index suite in Asia Pacific includes the long-running&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html"><b>Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence</b></a>, as well as the&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html"><b>Mastercard Index of Women’s Advancement</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html"><b>Mastercard Index of Financial Literacy</b></a>, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Mastercard Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the indices, Mastercard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html"><b>Online Shopping</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html"><b>Ethical Spending</b></a>&nbsp;and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html"><b>Travel</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html"><b>Dining &amp; Entertainment</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html"><b>Education</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html"><b>Money Management</b></a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> About Mastercard<p>Mastercard (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>www.Mastercard.com</b></a>, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. Mastercard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/mastercardap" target="_blank"><b>@MastercardAP</b></a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MastercardNews</b>,</a> join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Beyond the Transaction Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/subscribe" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank"><b>Engagement Bureau</b></a>.</p> Mastercard communications contact:<p><b>Georgette Tan<br> </b>+65 6390 5971<br> <a href="mailto:georgette.tan@mastercard.com">georgette.tan@mastercard.com</a></p> <p><b>Marissa Tree<br> </b>+65 9117 4810<br> <a href="mailto:samyong@webershandwick.com">mtree@webershandwick.com</a><i></i></p> <p></p> The Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific. It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region. In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent. The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2017/aseans-confidence-boosted-by-optimistic-youths2017-05-07T16:00:00.000Z2017-05-07T16:00:00.000ZBullish Outlook on Stock Market Lifts Consumer Confidence in Asia Pacific: Mastercard Index Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence Data – H1 2017<table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" border="1"> <tbody><tr class="table-description"><th rowspan="1" style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"></th> <th colspan="2" style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">H1 2017 Current Status</th> <th colspan="2" style="text-align: center;" class="table-description">Change from last half</th> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Asia Pacific</b></p> </th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>66.9</b></p> </th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Optimistic</b></p> </th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>4.2</b></p> </th> <th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Stable +</b></p> </th> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Korea</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>78.0</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Very Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>46.7</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Extreme Improvement</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Singapore</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>45.4</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Neutral -</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>15.4</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Significant Improvement</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Malaysia</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>42.3</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Neutral -</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>11.1</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Significant Improvement</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>China</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>88.2</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Very Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>7.4</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Some Improvement</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Bangladesh</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>89.4</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Very Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>6.6</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Some Improvement</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Hong Kong</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>47.0</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Neutral -</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>4.8</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable +</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Taiwan</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>38.3</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Pessimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>4.1</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable +</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Indonesia</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>74.8</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>4.0</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable +</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Australia</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>49.2</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Neutral -</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>2.7</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable +</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Japan</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>44.4</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Neutral -</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>1.4</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable +</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Cambodia</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>93.1</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Extremely Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-0.7</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable -</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Vietnam</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>90.8</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Extremely Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-1.5</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable -</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>New Zealand</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>60.5</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-1.7</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable -</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Sri Lanka</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>38.2</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Pessimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-2.0</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable -</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Philippines</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>88.8</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Very Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-2.7</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable -</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Thailand</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>63.9</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-4.4</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Stable -</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>Myanmar</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>86.8</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Very Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-6.0</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Some Deterioration</p> </td> </tr><tr><th style="text-align: center;" class="table-description"><p><b>India</b></p> </th> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>86.0</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>Very Optimistic</p> </td> <td style="text-align: center;"><p>-9.3</p> </td> <td width="165" style="text-align: center;"><p>Some Deterioration</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table> <p></p> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> <p></p> About the Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has an over 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific.</p> <p>It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. 18 Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> Mastercard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The Mastercard Index suite in Asia Pacific includes the long-running&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html"><b>Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence</b></a>, as well as the&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html"><b>Mastercard Index of Women’s Advancement</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html"><b>Mastercard Index of Financial Literacy</b></a>, and the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank"><b>Mastercard Index of Global Destination Cities</b></a>. In addition to the indices, Mastercard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html"><b>Online Shopping</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html"><b>Ethical Spending</b></a>&nbsp;and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html"><b>Travel</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html"><b>Dining &amp; Entertainment</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html"><b>Education</b></a>,&nbsp;<a href="/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html"><b>Money Management</b></a>, Luxury and General Shopping).</p> About Mastercard<p>Mastercard (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank"><b>www.Mastercard.com</b></a>, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. Mastercard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/mastercardap" target="_blank"><b>@MastercardAP</b></a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank"><b>@MastercardNews</b>,</a> join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/blog/" target="_blank"><b>Beyond the Transaction Blog</b></a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/subscribe" target="_blank"><b>subscribe</b></a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank"><b>Engagement Bureau</b></a>.</p> Mastercard communications contact:<p><b>Georgette Tan<br> </b>+65 6390 5971<br> <a href="mailto:georgette.tan@mastercard.com">georgette.tan@mastercard.com</a></p> <p><b>Marissa Tree<br> </b>+65 9117 4810<br> <a href="mailto:samyong@webershandwick.com">mtree@webershandwick.com</a><i></i></p> <p></p> The Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific. It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region. In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent. The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2017/bullish-outlook-on-stock-market2017-08-15T16:00:00.000Z2017-08-15T16:00:00.000ZConsumer confidence stable in Asia Pacific with emerging markets remaining the most optimistic Key APAC findings<ul> <li>Overall, consumer confidence in the <b>Asia Pacific markets remains stable</b>, increasing by just 0.05 points to 59.72 in H1 2016 from 59.67 points in H2 2015. The number of markets below the 50 neutral line remain the same (eight of the 17 markets) as the last survey.</li> <li><b>Taiwan</b>, which experienced extreme deterioration in consumer confidence in the previous survey recorded the largest improvement in the current survey. <b>Philippines</b>, <b>India</b> and <b>Malaysia</b> also saw improvements of at least 5 points.</li> <li>The developing markets of <b>India</b> (97.6), <b>Philippines</b> (95.2), <b>Vietnam</b> (94.9) and <b>Myanmar</b> (99.8) remain extremely optimistic in their outlook.</li> <li>Declines were recorded in seven out of 17 Asia Pacific markets, with significant deterioration seen in <b>Indonesia</b> (-14.7), <b>Hong Kong</b> (-12.4) and <b>Singapore</b> (-10.7). The decreases recorded in <b>Hong Kong</b>, <b>Japan </b>(-8.8) and <b>Singapore</b> moved these markets from neutral into pessimistic territory.</li> </ul> Country-level detail<ul> <li><b>India</b> (97.6) solidified its position in extremely optimistic territory, posting a 7.5 points gain, while <b>Malaysia</b> (41.4) halted its two year slide with a 9.5 points improvement with increases across all five components and a more than 10 points gain in outlook on the Stock market (+12.4) and Quality of Life (+11.4).</li> <li><b>Indonesia</b> (61.8, -14.7) recorded the largest decrease in confidence levels of all 17 markets surveyed. While all five components saw declines, Employment (-26.9) and the Economy (-22.5) registered particularly large drops.</li> <li><b>Hong Kong</b>, which showed significant deterioration from six months ago, saw a decrease of 12.4 points to 32.1 and now has the lowest score in the region. All five components declined, with outlook on Employment (-20.9) contributing the most to the drop.</li> <li><b>Singapore</b> saw a -10.7 drop to 33.6. Three of the components fell by more than 10 points: Quality of Life (-14.5), Regular Income (-12.0) and Employment (-11.0).</li> <li><b>Japan</b> (38.0, -8.8) moves further into sub-50 territory, driven downwards by a 22 points decline in confidence in the outlook of the local Stock Market (35.9).<b>Thailand</b> continues its two year slide since H1 2014 with confidence in the Economy (-11.3) registering the largest decline among the five components in this survey.</li> <li>While <b>Australia </b>and <b>New Zealand</b> remain in neutral territory, Australia recorded a slight drop of 0.1 points while New Zealand recorded an increase of 3.4 points, with improvements in outlook on Employment and Stock Market sentiment.</li> <li><b>Vietnam </b>(94.9, +0.7) and <b>Myanmar </b>(99.8, +4.0) remain in extremely optimistic territory, posting an increase in overall confidence, led by significant improvement in the Stock Market component (Property Market for Myanmar which does not have a stock market).</li> <li>Consumer confidence in <b>China</b> (76.0) and <b>Bangladesh</b> (71.6), both previously in the optimistic territory, posted slight increases of 1.4 points and 4.3 points respectively, which shifted China from optimistic to very optimistic territory.</li> <li><b>Sri Lanka</b> (38.0) decreased by 4.2 points to dip into pessimistic territory, while <b>South</b> <b>Korea </b>(34.2), despite a 0.4 points increase, remained in pessimistic territory.&nbsp;</li> </ul> Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence Data – H1 2016<table> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>H1 2016 Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>Change from last half</b></th> </tr><tr><td><b>Asia Pacific</b></td> <td>59.72</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>0.05</td> <td colspan="2">Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Australia</b></td> <td>42.2</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>-0.1</td> <td colspan="2">Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td><b>China</b></td> <td>76.0</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td>1.4</td> <td colspan="2">Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Hong Kong</b></td> <td>32.1</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-12.4</td> <td colspan="2">Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>India</b></td> <td>97.6</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>7.5</td> <td colspan="2">Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Indonesia</b></td> <td>61.8</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>-14.7</td> <td colspan="2">Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Japan</b></td> <td>38.0</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-8.8</td> <td colspan="2">Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Korea</b></td> <td>34.2</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>0.4</td> <td colspan="2">Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Malaysia</b></td> <td>41.4</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>9.5</td> <td colspan="2">Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>New Zealand</b></td> <td>55.4</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>3.4</td> <td colspan="2">Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Philippines</b></td> <td>95.2</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>12.9</td> <td colspan="2">Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Singapore</b></td> <td>33.6</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-10.7</td> <td colspan="2">Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Taiwan</b></td> <td>45.3</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td>16.3</td> <td colspan="2">Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Thailand</b></td> <td>58.2</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td>-8.5</td> <td colspan="2">Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Vietnam</b></td> <td>94.9</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>0.7</td> <td colspan="2">Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Myanmar</b></td> <td>99.8</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td>4.0</td> <td colspan="2">Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Bangladesh</b></td> <td>71.6</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td>4.3</td> <td colspan="2">Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td><b>Sri Lanka</b></td> <td>38.0</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td>-4.2</td> <td colspan="2">Stable -</td> </tr></tbody></table> <p></p> <table> <tbody><tr><td colspan="3"><b>Index Score Current Status</b></td> <td></td> <td colspan="2"><b>Change in Index Points from last half</b></td> <td colspan="2"><br type="_moz"> </td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description">Lower Range</th> <th class="table-description">Upper Range</th> <th class="table-description">Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</th> <th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description">Lower Range</th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2">Upper Range</th> <th class="table-description">Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</th> </tr><tr><td>0</td> <td>10</td> <td>Extremely Pessimistic</td> <td></td> <td>-100</td> <td colspan="2">-20</td> <td>Extreme Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td>10</td> <td>25</td> <td>Very Pessimistic</td> <td></td> <td>-20</td> <td colspan="2">-10</td> <td>Significant Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td>25</td> <td>40</td> <td>Pessimistic</td> <td></td> <td>-10</td> <td colspan="2">-5</td> <td>Some Deterioration</td> </tr><tr><td>40</td> <td>50</td> <td>Neutral -</td> <td></td> <td>-5</td> <td colspan="2">0</td> <td>Stable -</td> </tr><tr><td>50</td> <td>60</td> <td>Neutral +</td> <td></td> <td>0</td> <td colspan="2">5</td> <td>Stable +</td> </tr><tr><td>60</td> <td>75</td> <td>Optimistic</td> <td></td> <td>5</td> <td colspan="2">10</td> <td>Some Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td>75</td> <td>90</td> <td>Very Optimistic</td> <td></td> <td>10</td> <td colspan="2">20</td> <td>Significant Improvement</td> </tr><tr><td>90</td> <td>100</td> <td>Extremely Optimistic</td> <td></td> <td>20</td> <td colspan="2">100</td> <td>Extreme Improvement</td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific.</p> <p></p> <p>It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p></p> <p>The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.&nbsp;</p> Mastercard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The Mastercard Index suite in Asia Pacific includes the long-running <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">Mastercard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Mastercard Index of Financial Literacy</a>, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">Mastercard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the indices, Mastercard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">&nbsp;Online Shopping</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).&nbsp;</p> About Mastercard<p>Mastercard (NYSE: MA), <a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">www.Mastercard.com</a>, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. Mastercard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/mastercardap" target="_blank">@MastercardAP</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MastercardNews</a>, join the discussion on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/blog/" target="_blank">Beyond the Transaction Blog</a> and <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/subscribe" target="_blank">subscribe</a> for the latest news on the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">Engagement Bureau</a>.</p> Contacts<p><i>Georgette Tan,<br> Mastercard,<br> <a href="mailto:georgette.tan@mastercard.com">georgette.tan@mastercard.com</a>,<br> +65 6390 5971</i></p> <p><i>Samantha Yong, <br> Weber Shandwick,<br> <a href="mailto:samyong@webershandwick.com">samyong@webershandwick.com</a>, <br> +65 6825 8053<br> </i></p> The MasterCard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific. It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region. The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2016/consumer-confidence-stable-ap2016-08-10T16:00:00.000Z2016-08-10T16:00:00.000ZIndia’s Consumers are Most Optimistic in Asia Pacific: Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence Key APAC findings<ul> <li>Overall consumer confidence in <b>Asia Pacific remains stable with a slight improvement </b>of 1.2 points to 60.9 in H2 2016 from 59.7 points in H1 2016<b>,&nbsp; bringing the overall score from neutral to optimistic territory</b>. The number of markets below the 50 neutral line remain the same (eight of the 17 markets) as the last survey.</li> <li><b>Bangladesh</b>, which experienced a small improvement in consumer confidence in the previous survey, recorded the largest improvement among the 17 Asia Pacific markets in this survey with increases across all five components and a more than 10 points gain in outlook on Stock Market (+24.6), Quality of Life (+12.0) and Economy (+11.7). <b>Thailand </b>and <b>Hong Kong</b> also saw significant improvements of at least 10 points.</li> <li><b>India</b> (95.3), <b>Myanmar</b> (92.8), <b>Vietnam</b> (92.3) and <b>Philippines</b> (91.6) remain extremely optimistic in their outlook.</li> <li>Declines were recorded in eight out of 17 Asia Pacific markets, with significant deterioration seen in <b>Taiwan</b> (-11.1) and <b>Malaysia</b> (-10.2). The decreases recorded in <b>Taiwan</b> and <b>Malaysia</b> moved these markets from neutral into pessimistic territory.</li> </ul> <p></p> Country-level detail<ul> <li><b>India</b> (95.3) remains in extremely optimistic territory, with a slight decline of 2.4 points overall, due to small decreases in all five components, while <b>Thailand</b> (68.3) halted its two year slide recording a 10.1 points improvement with increases across all five components and a more than 10 points gain in outlook on the Economy (+11.2), Employment (+11.1) and Quality of Life (+14.3).</li> <li><b>Taiwan</b> (34.2, -11.1) showed the largest deterioration in confidence levels of all 17 markets surveyed. While all five components saw declines, Stock Market (-18.3) and Quality of Life (-14.9) registered particularly large drops.</li> <li><b>Malaysia</b> saw a significant decline from six months ago, with a decrease of 10.2 points to 31.2, dropping to the second lowest ranked in the region. All five components declined, with outlook on Stock Market (-13.1) contributing the most to the drop.</li> <li><b>Singapore</b> saw a drop of 3.6 points to 30.0. Three of the components fell by more than 5 points: Regular Income (-6.5), Economy (-6.1), and Employment (-5.2).</li> <li><b>Korea</b> (31.2, -3.0) moves further into sub-50 territory, driven downwards by an 8.7 points decline in confidence in outlook of the local Stock Market (28.1), while the outlook in <b>China </b>(80.8, +4.8) continues to increase since H2 2015 due to improvement across all five components, with Stock Market (+9.1) contributing the most to the increase.</li> <li><b>Australia </b>(46.5) remains in neutral territory, recording an increase of 4.2 points with improvements across all five components, while <b>New Zealand</b> (62.2, +6.8) recorded an improvement from neutral to optimistic territory since the previous survey with a more than 10 points gain in outlook on the Economy (+12.7), Employment (+11.4) and Quality of Life (+10.3).</li> <li><b>Vietnam </b>(92.3, -2.5) and <b>Myanmar </b>(92.8, -7.0) remain in extremely optimistic territory, despite a decrease in overall confidence, both led by a significant decrease in the Stock Market component (Property Market for Myanmar which does not have a stock market).</li> <li>Consumer confidence in <b>Hong Kong</b> (42.2), <b>Japan</b> (43.0) and <b>Sri Lanka</b> (40.1), all previously in the pessimistic territory, posted increases of 10.1 points, 5.0 points and 2.1 points respectively, which shifted all three markets from pessimistic to neutral territory.</li> </ul> <p></p> Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence Data – H2 2016<table> <tbody><tr><th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>H2 2016 Current Status</b></th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2"><b>Change from last half (H1 2016)</b></th> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Asia Pacific</b></td> <td width="30"><b>60.9</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>1.2</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Australia</b></td> <td width="30"><b>46.5</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td width="36"><b>4.2</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>China</b></td> <td width="30"><b>80.8</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>4.8</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Hong Kong</b></td> <td width="30"><b>42.2</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td width="36"><b>10.1</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>India</b></td> <td width="30"><b>95.3</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-2.4</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Indonesia</b></td> <td width="30"><b>70.8</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>9.0</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Some Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Japan</b></td> <td width="30"><b>43.0</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td width="36"><b>5.0</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Korea</b></td> <td width="30"><b>31.2</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-3.0</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Malaysia</b></td> <td width="30"><b>31.2</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-10.2</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>New Zealand</b></td> <td width="30"><b>62.2</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>6.8</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Some Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Philippines</b></td> <td width="30"><b>91.6</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-3.6</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Singapore</b></td> <td width="30"><b>30.0</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-3.6</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Taiwan</b></td> <td width="30"><b>34.2</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-11.1</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Thailand</b></td> <td width="30"><b>68.3</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>10.1</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Vietnam</b></td> <td width="30"><b>92.3</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-2.5</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Myanmar</b></td> <td width="30"><b>92.8</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>-7.0</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Bangladesh</b></td> <td width="30"><b>82.8</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td width="36"><b>11.2</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td width="101"><b>Sri Lanka</b></td> <td width="30"><b>40.1</b></td> <td width="114"><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td width="36"><b>2.1</b></td> <td width="162"><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> <table> <tbody><tr><td colspan="3"><b>Index Score Current Status</b></td> <td></td> <td colspan="2"><b>Change in Index Points from last half</b></td> <td colspan="2"><br type="_moz"> </td> </tr><tr><th class="table-description">Lower Range</th> <th class="table-description">Upper Range</th> <th class="table-description">Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</th> <th class="table-description"></th> <th class="table-description">Lower Range</th> <th class="table-description" colspan="2">Upper Range</th> <th class="table-description">Qualitative&nbsp; Statement</th> </tr><tr><td><b>0</b></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Pessimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-100</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>-20</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>10</b></td> <td><b>25</b></td> <td><b>Very Pessimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-20</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>-10</b></td> <td><b>Significant Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>25</b></td> <td><b>40</b></td> <td><b>Pessimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-10</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>-5</b></td> <td><b>Some Deterioration</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>40</b></td> <td><b>50</b></td> <td><b>Neutral -</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>-5</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>0</b></td> <td><b>Stable -</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>50</b></td> <td><b>60</b></td> <td><b>Neutral +</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>0</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>5</b></td> <td><b>Stable +</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>60</b></td> <td><b>75</b></td> <td><b>Optimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>5</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>10</b></td> <td><b>Some Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>75</b></td> <td><b>90</b></td> <td><b>Very Optimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>10</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>20</b></td> <td><b>Significant Improvement</b></td> </tr><tr><td><b>90</b></td> <td><b>100</b></td> <td><b>Extremely Optimistic</b></td> <td></td> <td><b>20</b></td> <td colspan="2"><b>100</b></td> <td><b>Extreme Improvement</b></td> </tr></tbody></table> Methodology<p>Respondents were asked five questions pertaining to their six-month outlook on the economy, their employment prospects, the local stock market, their regular income prospects, and their quality of life. The results of their responses were converted in five component indexes which were subsequently averaged to form the Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence (MICC) score. The MICC Index score and the 5 component index scores range from 0 – 100 where 0 represents maximum pessimism, 100 represents maximum optimism and 50 represents neutrality.</p> About the Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence<p>The Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific.</p> <p>It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region.&nbsp; In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent.</p> <p>The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> Mastercard and its Suite of Research Properties<p>The Mastercard Index suite in Asia Pacific includes the long-running <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.ConsumerConfidence.tagend.html">Mastercard Index of Consumer Confidence</a>, as well as the <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Women.tagend.html">Mastercard Index of Women’s Advancement</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Mastercard Index of Financial Literacy</a>, and the <a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/digital-press-kits/mastercard-global-destination-cities-index-2013/" target="_blank">Mastercard Index of Global Destination Cities</a>. In addition to the indices, Mastercard’s research properties also include a range of consumer surveys including <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Shopping.tagend.html">Online Shopping</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.EthicalSpending.tagend.html">Ethical Spending</a> and a series on Consumer Purchasing Priorities (covering <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Travel.tagend.html">Travel</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Dining.tagend.html">Dining &amp; Entertainment</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.Education.tagend.html">Education</a>, <a href="http://www.masterintelligence.com/content/intelligence/en/search.tagstart.MoneyManagement.tagend.html">Money Management</a>, Luxury and General Shopping).&nbsp;</p> About MasterCard<p>MasterCard&nbsp;(NYSE: MA),&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mastercard.com/index.html" target="_blank">www.mastercard.com</a>, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/mastercardap" target="_blank">@MasterCardAP</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/MasterCardNews" target="_blank">@MasterCardNews,</a>&nbsp;join the discussion on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/blog/" target="_blank">Beyond the Transaction Blog</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/subscribe" target="_blank">subscribe</a>&nbsp;for the latest news on the&nbsp;<a href="http://newsroom.mastercard.com/asia-pacific/" target="_blank">Engagement Bureau</a>.</p> Media Contacts<p><b>Georgette Tan</b>&nbsp;<br> MasterCard,&nbsp;<br> <a href="mailto:georgette_tan@mastercard.com" target="_blank">georgette_tan@mastercard.com</a>,<br> +65 6390 5971</p> <p><b>Samantha Yong</b>&nbsp;<br> Weber Shandwick,&nbsp;<br> <a href="mailto:samyong@webershandwick.com" target="_blank">samyong@webershandwick.com</a>,<br> +65 6825 8053<i></i></p> <p></p> Footnotes<p><a name="1"></a>[1] Property market for Myanmar which does not have a stock market</p> <p></p> <div style="position: absolute; left: -1000px; top: -1000px;">[1] Property market for Myanmar which does not have a stock market</div> <div style="position: absolute; left: -1000px; top: -1000px;">[1] Property market for Myanmar which does not have a stock market</div> <div style="position: absolute; left: -1000px; top: -1000px;">[1] Property market for Myanmar which does not have a stock market</div> <div style="position: absolute; left: -1000px; top: -1000px;">[1] Property market for Myanmar which does not have a stock market</div> The Mastercard Index™ of Consumer Confidence survey has a 20-year track record of consumer confidence indices collected from over 200,000 interviews, unequalled both in scope and history across Asia Pacific. It is the most comprehensive and longest running survey of its kind in the region. In June 1997, the Index revealed a decline in consumer confidence – one month prior to the devaluation of the Thai baht that triggered the regional economic crisis. In June 2003, the Index score for Employment in Hong Kong dropped to a low score of 20.0. This was subsequently reflected in Hong Kong’s unemployment rate, which peaked just before September 2003 at eight percent. The survey began in the first half of 1993 and has been conducted twice yearly since. Seventeen Asia Pacific markets now participate in the survey: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.http://origin-www1.mastercard.com/content/intelligence/en/research/press-release/2017/india-consumers-optimistic-ap2017-01-15T16:00:00.000Z2017-01-15T16:00:00.000Z